Ingrid Pollard’s work on display at Staying Power: Photographs of Black British Experience 1950s-1990s

Source: V&A Museum

Ingrid Pollard

w290 Ingrid Pollards work on display at Staying Power: Photographs of Black British Experience 1950s 1990s

Ingrid Pollard, from the series ‘Self Evident’. Museum no. E.327-2013. © Ingrid Pollard/ Victoria and Albert Museum, London. Supported by the National Lottery through the Heritage Lottery Fund.

Ingrid Pollard was born in Georgetown, Guyana in 1953 and moved to England when she was four years old. Since then she has lived in London working as a photographer, printer, media artist and researcher. She is a graduate of the London College of Printing and Derby University. In the 1980s she was part of a group of black British women artists who exhibited their work together in exhibitions like The Thin Black Line at the ICA in 1985. Pollard was also part of significant collaborative ventures between black British photographers, including Polareyes, D-Max and the Association of Black Photographers (now Autograph ABP), of which she was a founding member.

Pollard became interested in photography when she took her father’s box camera on a camping trip. Some of her first photographs were of the sewage works and wood yards along the Lee Valley Canal, taken as part of an O-Level geography project. Pollard defines her work as ‘a social practice concerned with representation, history and landscape with reference to race, difference and the materiality of lens based media.’ Her photographic series such as Pastoral Interlude (1988) and Self Evident (1995) depict black figures in rural landscape settings.

See Pollards work on display at the V&A Museum in London.

Display: 16 February 2015 – 24 May 2015. Staying Power: Photographs of Black British Experience 1950s-1990s is a project to increase the number of black British photographers and images of black Britain in the V&A collection. It aims to raise awareness of the contribution of black Britons to British culture and society, as well as to the art of photography.

Photographer Jennie Baptiste on display – Staying Power: Photographs of Black British Experience 1950s-1990s

Source V&A Museum

Jennie Baptiste

w290 Photographer Jennie Baptiste on display     Staying Power: Photographs of Black British Experience 1950s 1990s

Jennie Baptiste, ‘Ragga Crouching’, 1993. Museum no. E.973-2010. © Jennie Baptiste/ Victoria and Albert Museum, London. Supported by the National Lottery through the Heritage Lottery Fund.

Photographer Jennie Baptiste was born in Northwest London in 1971, after her parents moved to the city from the Caribbean island of St. Lucia in the 1960s. She graduated from the London College of Communication Bachelor of Arts Photography course in 1994. Her photographs explore fashion and style as expressions of black British identity, often with a focus on music culture. She has photographed prominent hip hop artists such as P. Diddy, Jay Z and Mary J. Blige. Her work has been exhibited internationally and a selection of her photographs were included in the Black British Style exhibition held at the V&A in 2004.

See Jennie Baptiste’s work at the V&A Museum in London.

Display: 16 February 2015 – 24 May 2015. Staying Power: Photographs of Black British Experience 1950s-1990s is a project to increase the number of black British photographers and images of black Britain in the V&A collection. It aims to raise awareness of the contribution of black Britons to British culture and society, as well as to the art of photography.

British Jamaican photographer Maxine Walker – on exhibit at the London’s V & A

Source: V & A

Maxine Walker

w290 British Jamaican photographer Maxine Walker   on exhibit at the Londons V & A

Maxine Walker, from the series ‘Untitled’, 1995. Museum no. E.303-2013. © Maxine Walker / Autograph ABP/ Victoria and Albert Museum, London. Supported by the National Lottery through the Heritage Lottery Fund.

Born in 1962, British Jamaican photographer Maxine Walker lives and works in Birmingham. Her photographs raise questions about the nature of identity, challenging racial stereotypes. She contests photography’s documentary ability by replicating specific photographic styles, such as in her early series Auntie Linda’s House (1987). Her Black Beauty series from the 1980s and her untitled series for the ‘Self Evident’ exhibition in 1995 both utilise self-portraiture.

See her work at the Victoria & Albert Museum in London

Display: 16 February 2015 – 24 May 2015. Staying Power: Photographs of Black British Experience 1950s-1990s is a project to increase the number of black British photographers and images of black Britain in the V&A collection. It aims to raise awareness of the contribution of black Britons to British culture and society, as well as to the art of photography.

A Day in Brussels – Meeting Minister Cecile Kyenge, Italy

BEWC premeeting 1024x776 A Day in Brussels   Meeting Minister Cecile Kyenge, Italy

From left: Light Up a Girl’s Life project manager with Members of the Black European Women’s Council at the EESC.

With roots stemming back to 2007 with The Vienna Declaration the Black European Women’s Council (BEWC) is set to revive itself. The first step was a face-to-face meeting with some of the board members representing Austria, Italy, Sweden and the United Kingdom.

Meeting with MEP Italy 1024x768 A Day in Brussels   Meeting Minister Cecile Kyenge, Italy

Talking with Minister Kyenge.

In addition to discussing the future of the BEWC we had the honor of meeting with Minister Kyenge, Italy, thanks to our Italian board member, Dr. Susanne Mbiye.

20150225 163625 733x1024 A Day in Brussels   Meeting Minister Cecile Kyenge, Italy

Minister Kyenge’s Global Citizenship Award for her groundbreaking work on immigrant rights fro children in Italy.

Minister Kyenge has received global recognition for becoming the first black women in the Italian Parliament and for her position on granting citizenship to the children of immigrants born in Italy. She has also received verbal abuse from her colleagues in Italy.

20150225 165706 1024x563 A Day in Brussels   Meeting Minister Cecile Kyenge, Italy

With Minister Kyenge. She is grace personified.

Despite her hectic schedule including plenary and other meetings that day Minister Kyenge greeted each one of us with a warm handshake and parted with a kiss on the cheek. She, I can attest, is grace personified.

Casting Call- Miss Africa Netherlands 2015-2016

logoF Casting Call  Miss Africa Netherlands 2015 2016

We are pleased to announce the start of the journey to the 3rd edition of Miss Africa Netherlands (Miss Africa Netherlands 2015-2016).

Are you the Next Miss Africa Netherlands? Do you have the Poise, Eloquence, and Charisma? Are you determined to be a Role Model and Ambassador for Change in your Community? Do you have what it takes to be Miss Africa Netherlands 2015-2016? We are looking for you.

This is a once in a life-time opportunity to be the change that you want to see in the world.

5 4121 Casting Call  Miss Africa Netherlands 2015 2016

Contestants willing to participate by representing their countries can now register. Registration starts 1st February 2015 as from 9am via our website and closes on 15 March 2015. The casting/audition will take place in April at a location to be announced in Amsterdam.

We urge all contestants to visit our website, read and understand all the rules therein prior to filling the application form to become Miss Africa Netherlands 2015-2016 Queen.

We wish you all a fun filled journey to the Crown.

We are also calling on individuals, groups, organizations and business who may be interested to sponsor, volunteer and or become a Matron/Patron, vendors, photographers, MUAs, Designers, Stylists and those willing to advertise with us, to please send us an e-mail indicating their interests.

The Miss Africa Netherlands Team

pixel Casting Call  Miss Africa Netherlands 2015 2016