To Exist is to Resist – Call for Submissions

To Exist is to Resist: Black Feminism in Europe

black feminism

This edited collection will explore how women of colour:

  • Theorize Black feminism and womanism from European perspectives
  • Build and sustain activist spaces for survival and resistance
  • Challenge, subvert and transform socialist, feminist, populist and/or anarchist politics
  • Develop transnational alliances and intersectional and intergenerational coalitions for equality and social justice
  • Engage with creative practice as a means of activism and self-preservation

We have an agreement in principle from Pluto Press to publish this edited collection.

Deadlines

We seek 3,000-5,000 word chapters (including bibliography) in English from activists, practitioners, artists, students, and scholars by Monday, 18th September 2017.

If you’re interested in contributing a chapter, please contact Akwugo Emejulu.


 

Black Youth Achievements Publication – Out In October 2017

The Black Youth Achievements (BYA) is the initiative of our 2010 Power Lister Kay Oldroyd.

Young People Insight

Black Youth Achievements

We’re working with ‘Young People Insight’ who are currently conducting interviews with various young achievers from around the UK and these will be published as ‘Stories of Success’.

The A4 magazine will also contain a directory of much-needed products and services that will enable and empower young people, parents, schools, and communities.

Black Youth Achievements

We’ll be having a launch event with UCL and Leading Routes who are our partners on this initiative. The magazine is due out in October and 5000 free copies will be distributed in the following areas to start with:-

Black Youth Achievements

London / Luton / Milton Keynes / Birmingham / Manchester / Leeds / Sheffield / Ipswich / Nottingham / Surrey / Sussex.

There will also be an online version.

Black Youth Achievements

**Do you have a product or service that you would like to advertise? Check out the rates and then get in touch**

#WeCelebrateSuccess
www.bya-awards.com

** – restrictions apply e.g – we will not advertise tobacco, alcohol, chemically enhanced food products, sexually explicit material etc


 

French President’s Senegalese-born press secretary Sibeth Ndiaye

Many agree that Macron owes much of his recent success to the work of Ndiaye – and she will likely continue to play an important role in his term as president.

Sibeth NDiaye
Sibeth NDiaye, Macron’s Press Relations Officer. PIcture from glamourparis.com

Source: mg.co.za

37-year-old Sibeth Ndiaye is making a name for herself as the communications advisor to French President Emmanuel Macron. Born in Dakar, she quickly found herself in the world of politics after moving to Paris and becoming involved with the National Union of Students of France (UNEF) while studying health economics at Paris-Sorbonne University. She joined the French Socialist Party in 2002, ultimately becoming the secretary in charge of early childhood.

Although Macron’s wife Brigitte is widely known as his main confidant, Ndiaye was also heavily involved in his PR campaign throughout the election, granting or denying the media access to the presidential candidate for interviews and managing his image in what turned out to be one of the most divisive French elections in recent history. Ndiaye was even ranked ninth out of the fifteen most important personalities who were closest to Macron during his campaign.

In a recent interview with weekly news magazine Jeune Afrique, Ndiaye said she did not officially become a French citizen until June 2016 – and that was

“after a long hesitation.”

When questioned over her status as a role model for young African women who are considering a career in politics, she was reluctant to accept the title.

“I do not see myself as a role model at all. My professional career was built upon encounters with people who trusted me …this leads me to believe that my success is because of my contact with the right people, people who do not see skin color, social origin or education background.”

Read the full article.


 

Haddy N’jie is the darling of Norway

Haddy Jatou N’jie is a Norwegian singer-songwriter, writer, journalist, TV presenter, charity ambassador, and activist.

Haddy N'jie

Haddy Jatou N’jie the singer-songwriter.

Haddy Jatou N’jie the journalist.

Haddy N'jie

Program leaders Haddy N’jie and Swedish Per Sinding-Larsen present Norway’s history 1814-2014.

 

Haddy Jatou N’jie the TV presenter.

Haddy Jatou N’jie the charity ambassador.

Haddy N'jie

Haddy N’jie the activist.

Shout, Sister, Shout

Nigger in the woodpile. Say what?

Source: Black Women in Europe™ Social Media Group

A Conservative MP has been suspended from the party after it emerged she used a racist expression during a public discussion about Brexit.

nigger
Ms Morris has been MP for Newton Abbot since 2010

According to the British Broadcasting Corporation  Anne Marie Morris, the MP for Newton Abbot, used the phrase at an event in London to describe the prospect of the UK leaving the EU without a deal.

Don’t believe me? Click on the image below to listen to her say it courtesy of the Huffington Post UK:
nigger

Why in the world would Morris say,

Now we get to the real nigger in the woodpile

when suggesting that just 7% of financial services would be affected by Brexit is beyond me. And apparently beyond the grasp of PM May who acted swiftly saying,

“I immediately asked the chief whip to suspend the party whip,” she said in a statement. “Language like this has absolutely no place in politics or in today’s society.”  (source : BBC) That’s a no-brainer but was a necessary statement and move.

And it didn’t stop there.

Leader Tim Farron said he was “shocked” and called for her to be suspended from the parliamentary party. “This disgusting comment belongs in the era of the Jim Crow laws and has no place in our Parliament,” he said. (source: BBC)

Now why is this a big deal?  The BBC breaks it down like this:

The phrase originated in the American Deep South in the mid-19th Century and is thought to have referred to slaves having to conceal themselves as they sought to flee north and secure their freedom.

It was subsequently used in the 20th Century – including by a number of leading novelists – as a metaphor to describe a hidden fact or problem.

This is another example why The Black Women in Europe™ Social Media Group non-profit is vital. We face attacks like this daily whether others see or hear them or not. It is not in our heads. It is a reality.

You can support us by making a donation and by submitting the names to contact@bwiesmg.org of organizations across Europe that support black women as we build the most comprehensive directory of its kind.