Polyglot is a new scripted web series from Rwandan-German visual artist and self-taught filmmaker Amelia Umuhire

Hat tip: Babz Rawls

Source: okayafrica.com

Polyglot is a new scripted web series from Rwandan-German visual artist and self-taught filmmaker Amelia Umuhire that explores the multi-hyphenate identities of young creatives of color in Berlin. The show’s first episode, which premiered in April, introduced viewers to Babiche Papaya, a rapper and poet played by Umuhire’s sister, Amanda Mukasonga. Titled “The Bewerbungsgespräch” (“The Interview”), the five minute clip follows Papaya as she tries to find a home among other international Berliners.

With its intimate fly-on-the-wall cinematography, Umuhire plans for future episodes of the web series to focus on a rotating cast of young polyglots navigating daily life in the German capital. The show’s recently-uploaded second episode, “Les Mals du Pays,” returns to Babiche’s world as she deals with the malaise of homesickness and the frustrations of maintaining a natural hair care routine. “If I were in a TV show, normally as me a black woman, I wouldn’t get to be this real, as this 3D, as deep as a character, you know,” Mukasonga told NPR Berlin of her role in the series.

Read the full story on okayafricacom.

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A multimedia feature film about Gentrification in Brixton and South London

Hat tip: Babz Rawls

A Moving Image : A Film about Gentrification

 A multimedia feature film about Gentrification in Brixton and South London

Tanya Fear

Storyline

A Moving Image is a multimedia feature film about Gentrification in Brixton, incorporating fiction, documentary and performance art.

We follow Nina, a young stifled artist as she returns to her community after a long absence – she is soon painted as a symbol of gentrification and struggles with her complicity.

She forms a three-way relationship with an actor called Mickey and a Nigerian performance artist called Ayo, who both have very different views on the changes taking place in their environment.

During an unnaturally hot summer in London, Nina sets out to create the ultimate piece of art to explore her complex relationship with her community.

In doing so, she poses a tricky question – is she truly part of the problem or can she use her work to be part of the solution?

On her journey, she interviews real members of the community who have been affected by Gentrification, blurring the line between reality and fiction.

Trailer

Producer

Screen Shot 2014 12 11 at 10.30.34 A multimedia feature film about Gentrification in Brixton and South London

Rienkje Attoh

Rienkje Attoh is a National Film and Television School (NFTS) graduate. While at the school she produced a mix of fiction (The Agreement, The Earth Belongs To No One), animation (Banaroo) and documentary (The Pink House) shorts. She has also co-produced (Hen Pecked), and is currently developing a slate of her productions.
She is one of the three inaugural Prince William scholars supported by BAFTA and Warner Bros. She is mentored by Christine Langan, the head of BBC Films and Chris Law at Warner Bros.

Rienkje has over seven years broadcast experience. She started her career as a journalist at BBC South West in 2006, moving on to produce news and current affairs programmes for TV. In 2009 she moved to BBC London where she produced numerous radio programmes, including The Late Show with Nikki Bedi. She has also worked as a production journalist for ITN and voice artist for Euronews.

Cast

tanya1  242x300 A multimedia feature film about Gentrification in Brixton and South London

Tanya Fear

Tanya Fear is a London based actress. She is currently shooting a 10 episode Canal+ crime drama called “Spotless”. She has starred in TV shows such as “Some Girls” The Midnight Beast and upcoming BBC1 comedy Boomers. She is passionate about film and theatre and starred in hit African comedy “The Epic Adventure of Nhamo the Manyika Warrior and his Sexy Wife Chipo” at the Tricycle Theatre. She also starred in US summer blockbuster “Kick Ass 2”.

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Contribute via Crowdsourcing.

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Memories from 2015 Black Portraiture{s} II Conference: Imaging the Black Body and Re-Staging Histories in Florence

Florence 1 1024x768 Memories from 2015 Black Portraiture{s} II Conference: Imaging the Black Body and Re Staging Histories in Florence

With the exhibit curator. (photo credit: J. Lind)

Florence 2 1024x768 Memories from 2015 Black Portraiture{s} II Conference: Imaging the Black Body and Re Staging Histories in Florence

With a Senegalese photographer, one of his works; the curator with fans, additional photography.

Florence3 1024x768 Memories from 2015 Black Portraiture{s} II Conference: Imaging the Black Body and Re Staging Histories in Florence

Installations on display. (Photos credit J. Lind)

Florence4 1024x768 Memories from 2015 Black Portraiture{s} II Conference: Imaging the Black Body and Re Staging Histories in Florence

Taking it all in, an artist with her work, me taking it all in. (Photo credit: J. Lind)

Florence5 1024x768 Memories from 2015 Black Portraiture{s} II Conference: Imaging the Black Body and Re Staging Histories in Florence

Three s of dozens of panels, chatting in between sessions. (Photo credit J. Lind)

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Race and Resistance across Borders in the Long Twentieth Century event – June 5th in Oxford

 Race and Resistance across Borders in the Long Twentieth Century event   June 5th in Oxford

Launched in January 2013, the Race and Resistance network brings together researchers in the history, literature, and culture of anti-racist movements in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Europe, Latin America, the United States, and beyond.

We meet every Friday during term-time, with sessions taking a variety of formats, including lectures by invited speakers, short research presentations, seminars discussing pre-circulated texts from a range of disciplines, book launches, and film screenings.

All are welcome to attend.

The interdisciplinary research group ‘Race and Resistance across Borders in the Long Twentieth Century’ brings together researchers in the history, literature and culture of anti-racist movements in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Europe, Latin America, the United States, and beyond.

Events will take place in the TORCH Seminar Room, 3rd Floor of the Radcliffe Humanities Building, Oxford University (unless otherwise stated), and lunch will be provided at the lunchtime meetings.

5th June, 12.45 – 2pm: (Colin Matthew Room, ground floor of Radcliffe Humanities)

Research presentations by members of the ‘Race and Resistance’ network

Gaetan Maret (English): ‘Césaire’s 1939 Cahier d’un Retour au Pays Natal and black America’

Mai Musié (Classics): ‘Ethnic Identity in the Ancient Novel’

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Race and Resistance across Borders in the Long Twentieth Century event – May 29 in Oxford

 Race and Resistance across Borders in the Long Twentieth Century event   May 29 in Oxford

Launched in January 2013, the Race and Resistance network brings together researchers in the history, literature, and culture of anti-racist movements in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Europe, Latin America, the United States, and beyond.

We meet every Friday during term-time, with sessions taking a variety of formats, including lectures by invited speakers, short research presentations, seminars discussing pre-circulated texts from a range of disciplines, book launches, and film screenings.

All are welcome to attend.

The interdisciplinary research group ‘Race and Resistance across Borders in the Long Twentieth Century’ brings together researchers in the history, literature and culture of anti-racist movements in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Europe, Latin America, the United States, and beyond.

Events will take place in the TORCH Seminar Room, 3rd Floor of the Radcliffe Humanities Building, Oxford University (unless otherwise stated), and lunch will be provided at the lunchtime meetings.

29th May, 5pm: (**please note change to time)

Chaired by Tiziana Morosetti (University of Oxford), the round table discusses contemporary attempts to re-enact ‘human zoos’ and their artistic politics after the much-criticised and eventually cancelled performance of Brett Bailey’s Exhibit B at the Barbican in 2014. Are re-enactments of ‘human zoos’ useful/desirable? Do they effectively tackle racial politics? Are we, as one petition stated, justified in censoring them when they risk being racially offensive?

The interdisciplinary research group ‘Race and Resistance across Borders in the Long Twentieth Century’ brings together researchers in the history, literature and culture of anti-racist movements in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Europe, Latin America, the United States, and beyond.

 

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Race and Resistance across Borders in the Long Twentieth Century event-May 22 in Oxford

 Race and Resistance across Borders in the Long Twentieth Century event May 22 in Oxford

Launched in January 2013, the Race and Resistance network brings together researchers in the history, literature, and culture of anti-racist movements in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Europe, Latin America, the United States, and beyond.

We meet every Friday during term-time, with sessions taking a variety of formats, including lectures by invited speakers, short research presentations, seminars discussing pre-circulated texts from a range of disciplines, book launches, and film screenings.

All are welcome to attend.

The interdisciplinary research group ‘Race and Resistance across Borders in the Long Twentieth Century’ brings together researchers in the history, literature and culture of anti-racist movements in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Europe, Latin America, the United States, and beyond.

Events will take place in the TORCH Seminar Room, 3rd Floor of the Radcliffe Humanities Building, Oxford University (unless otherwise stated), and lunch will be provided at the lunchtime meetings.

22nd May, 12.45 – 2pm:

Research presentations by members of the ‘Race and Resistance’ network

Zainab Alsayegh (English): ‘Opacity and Interstiality in the Autobiography’

Ed Dodson (English): ‘Postimperial British Fiction: The Legacy of Empire and the Racial Categorisation of Authors’

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The Collegium for African American Research conference, Liverpool – Mobilising Memory: Creating African Atlantic Identities

Hat Tip: Angela Shaw

cropped cropped image 2 credit 300x117 The Collegium for African American Research conference, Liverpool   Mobilising Memory: Creating African Atlantic Identities

JUNE 24-28 2015, LIVERPOOL UNITED KINGDOM

Liverpool is home to one of the oldest and largest Black British communities. The city itself has a chequered history as Britain’s largest slave port with a legacy of conflicted race relations. As one of the most important port cities of the Atlantic world, Liverpool grew financially rich on the proceeds. The city has also been enriched culturally through the role it has played in forming and framing black communities throughout the diaspora. Liverpool has itself been shaped by the cultures of this diaspora. The city’s rich musical culture (formed in part from African American roots) and vernacular energy give a unique and dynamic quality to discussions about cultural creativity. Its rich heritage, together with the vibrancy and malleability of Liverpool, have led CAAR to hold its 11th biannual conference on “Mobilising Memory: Creating African Atlantic Identities” at Liverpool Hope University.

Our conference recognises the importance of memory and memorialisation. We want to encourage papers about memory that see it as an active, ideological and often political process which communities and individual black subjects have used as a mobilising tool to counter hegemonic ideas and societal hierarchies in all areas of the African Atlantic and beyond. Papers can be about the physical action of mobility, addressing the long history of travel narratives in African Atlantic culture—including those where the experience is that of being “always elsewhere” (D’Aguiar)—or it can take mobilising as being more politically attuned and related to the way memory is used as a tool for changing consciousness and for creating homespace in the diaspora. The memory of slavery in the host city of Liverpool is so all-pervasive that its very bricks and mortar were said to be steeped in the blood of the trade. Activists both in the city and beyond have counteracted amnesia by mobilising culturally and politically against such wilful forgetting. The conference comes on the 50th Anniversary of Malcolm X’s final visit to Britain; his intervention in domestic and international racial politics during that sojourn is an exemplar of the local and global implications of memories of black presence creating new transnational realities in the face of global oppression.

CAAR2015@hope.ac.uk

CAAR Conference 2015
Liverpool Hope University
Hope Park
Liverpool
L16 9JD
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Registration and Accommodation

Registration is now open via the online store. Please ensure that you register under the correct category. Some categories are password protected; if you are a student and need a password and have not received one by 5pm today please email caar2015@hope.ac.uk with some proof that you are a student to request one.

In the registration process you will be able to reserve your on-campus accommodation, add on extras, and state any other additional requirements. If you wish to stay off-campus, please see the Visit Liverpool website for other accommodation. Two local off-campus hotels include the Childwall Abbey and the Penny Lane Hotel, both are walking distance to the conference.

General Registration: for all presenting and non-presenting delegates who are not students. Not password protected.

Student – not presenting: for all students who are not presenting a paper. Password protected, email us with some proof of you being a student to receive the password.

Student – presenting: for all students who are presenting a paper. Password protected, if you haven’t yet received a password please email us.

Hope post grads: for all Hope post grads. Password protected, email  us with proof you are a Hope student for a password.

Day rates: for all who are not attending the full conference. Not password protected.

About CAAR

The Collegium of African American Research (CAAR) was founded at the University of the Sorbonne Nouvelle in 1992 and incorporated at the University of Rome later that year. From its inception it has worked to stimulate research in African American Studies in Europe and beyond. CAAR promotes intellectual collaboration through the creation of an international and interdisciplinary research and teaching network. CAAR organizes bi-annual conferences, sponsors local symposia, helps to create research networks, and supports publications, most prominently its FORECAAST Series (Forum for European Contributions in African American Studies).

The first volume of the FORECAAST series was issued by Lit Verlag in 1999, and for its twentieth volume, the series moved to the University of Liverpool Press. Begun as an occasional publication of monographs and themed, selected conference papers, the Series has always sought to highlight the best recent scholarship in the field. In 2013, FORECAAST became an annual publication of CAAR, reflecting the growth of the organisation and the richness of the scholarship produced by its members.

CAAR is a financially independent, international organization of African-American and Black Diaspora scholars from over 25 countries, including the US, Canada, Japan, China, several African countries and all European countries. Members come from a range of disciplines including literature, history, cultural studies, film studies, social sciences, as well as from queer studies and gender studies.

The membership is made up equally of professors, students, and individual researchers and activists outside the academy. Due to the location of the current presidency, CAAR activities are primarily run out of University of Bremen.

 

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