AFROPOLITAN FESTIVAL 2017 Brussels 3-5 February

The Afropolitan Festival is three days of exceptional programming dedicated to Afropolitan art, creativity and state of mind, presented by BOZAR and its partners, with honorary guest artists Fredy Massamba, the great voice of Afro-soul, and Tatiana Silva, television presenter. Some thirty multidisciplinary events with over 70 artists and cultural players from Belgium, the two Congos, Ghana and Europe are articulated around three themes: the Belgian Congolese diaspora, Afropolitans of Europe, and bridges between Sub-Saharans and North Africans. The majority of the events are free.

Join us at the official opening of the Festival, Friday February 3 at 20:00 in the Horta Hall, in the company of the Festival’s honorary guests Fredy Massamba and Tatiana Silva, and with the performance of the dance duo, Les Mybalés.

Ongoing and forthcoming

MUSIC

MUSIC – AFROPOLITAN FESTIVAL 2017

Afropolitan FestivalFrom hybrid rumba to Afro-funk by way of the high life and slam, musical adventures are guaranteed!

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THEATRE & DANCE

THEATRE/SLAM – AFROPOLITAN FESTIVAL 2017

Afropolitan Festival Spotlight on new dramatic arts.

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AGORA

DEBATES

Afropolitan FestivalThree themed debates: How is the fight against afrophobia progressing in Europe*? From Black Pete to the “Noirauds”, what of these various “Black face” practices here in Belgium? What are the relation…

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HORTA HALL

MARKET PLACE – AFROPOLITAN FESTIVAL 2017

Afropolitan festival

An open space where people can meet, enjoy themselves, savour the moment, sit, chill, dream… Arts & Crafts Coproduced by Roots Events, the “Brussels African Market” brings together the best Afropoli…

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La Noire de… d’Ousmane Sembène

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La Noire de… d’Ousmane Sembène


Le 1er octobre, BOZAR CINEMA présente La Noire de…  d’Ousmane Sembène. Dans ce film datant de 1966, le réalisateur sénégalais explore la dynamique complexe de la période post-coloniale au travers de l’histoire de Diouana, jeune sénégalaise engagée comme servante dans une famille française.En présence des comédiens Mbissine Thérèse Diop et Philippe Fontaine.

Palais des Beaux-Arts01.10.2015
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© All Rights Reserved

La Noire de… raconte l’histoire de Diouana, jeune Sénégalaise qu’un couple français basé à Dakar ramène avec eux à Antibes. Alors qu’elle croyait travailler comme gouvernante pour les enfants du couple, Diouana réalise très vite qu’elle doit aussi s’occuper des tâches ménagères, sans salaire et sans reconnaissance.

 

Diouna finit par se suicider, déçue par l’abîme de différence entre la réalité de sa vie française et ses vieux rêves sur le beau monde.La Noire de…, sorti en 1966 et récompensé du Prix Jean Vigo, premier long métrage d’Ousmane Sembène (1923-2007), est un film foncièrement engagé.

 

La domination culturelle, l’esclavage moderne, la condition de la femme, Ousmane Sembène explore des thèmes qui deviendront film après film le combat de toute une vie. L’écrivain et spécialiste du cinéma Georges Sadoul a par ailleurs déclaré que « grâce à Sembène Ousmane, le continent noir a pris enfin place dans l’histoire du cinéma mondial ».Le film a été présenté dans la section « Cannes Classics » au dernier Festival de Cannes. La copie vient d’être restaurée par la Cineteca di Bologna et The Film Foundation’s World Cinema Project.

 

Avant la projection sera présenté le documentaire Sembene !  retraçant la vie et l’œuvre du « père du cinéma africain ».

Informations pratiques

18h30 – « Sembene !» (documentaire) de Samba Gadjigo et Jason Silverman (2015)

20h – « La Noire de… » d’Ousmane Sembène (1966)

Jeudi 1er octobre

Palais des Beaux-Arts – Salle M

Prix

€ 6 / 4 euros pour Sembene !

€ 8 / 6 euros pour La Noir de…

Pass € 9 euros

Langue : français

Coproduction : BOZAR CINEMA & Le centre du Monde

Info & Tickets

+32 (0)2 507 82 00www.bozar.be

All About Angel Kaba

Hat tip Women of the African Diaspora

Angel Kaba

Photo credit: Chris Pollard

Angel Kaba is a multi-talented creative in Belgium. Here’s what she can do:

Artistic & Creative Director

Overall artistic vision for the project, manage a team of key people and find the right elements, enhancing the client /project (fashion design, ITW, Sport …).  

Staging & Coaching

Set up a plan for the client/project, coaching and awareness of stage potential.

Management & Marketing

Find opportunities, manage contacts & communication, work and make connection with PR & WEB SPECIALISTS, develop the visual aspects for the client / project. 

Choreographer

Creation of choreography and consistency between universe and ideas of the client/project.

Producer

Manage and find the budget, fix set and achieve goals, set up a team that manages and/or assists the project.

Casting Director

Scouting talent and helping the talent to excel.

Visit Angel Kaba‘s website for inspiration and contact information.

 

A tale of two cities: Bruges and Ghent

In the 11th article in our “Inside View” series Madalena Pedro Miala recounts growing up in Belgium.

Not so very long ago a video of actor Jesse Williams surfaced on the net, in it he explains quite eloquently – as we’ve grown to be accustomed by now coming from him – why he, like many others, was not interested in (American) history growing up. The essence behind his explanation reminded me of Nigerian author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s TED Talk about ‘The Danger of A Single Story’. At the risk of being accused of namedropping, I would in closing like to cite director Tim Reid, who in an interview given some time ago last year so rightly pointed to the fact that we are no longer living in a time in which only one narrative is relevant. We are now in fact dealing with a very mobile diaspora in which all voices and stories are very much deserving of a listener.

This long preface just to bring me to a a point we often discuss when talking about Black women living in Europe: racism. We often wonder whether one has experienced discrimination as a Black person living in Europe? Yes, I have. It ranges from petty behavior like always having to show my bus ticket when I step into the bus to more institutionalized forms of discrimination that I believe are part of the culprit that have kept me and many others stagnant in our career paths despite being fluent in numerous languages and possesing an array of much needed and employable skills. I am not going to focus on either one of those two stories, we have enough dichotomies going on in our worldview today. I’d rather share a more nuanced, humorous story that coincidently also consists of two parts, hence the title ‘A tale of two cities’.

Bruges

Madalena in 2nd grade in Bruges.

Madalena in 2nd grade in Bruges.

Caspar* threw a puzzling look my way as we were going up the stairs after the break. He repeated this about two or three times. I braced myself mentally for what I was sure was about to ensue: the generic N-word was going to verbally be tossed my way. Imagine my surprise when instead Caspar asked me whether I was a fan of Cercle Brugge. I must’ve given a negative response because the next question he threw my way was why then, if I wasn’t a die hard fan of Cercle Brugge, did I decide to wear their scarf. That’s when my attention shifted to that thing around my neck. We had just moved to Bruges and despite having lived most of my life on the Northern hemisphere, even till this day I am not accustomed to the weather conditions and always prefer spring and summer over the colder months. So in all my haste to protect myself from the winter, I just threw something on without thinking too much about it. No, it had not occured to me that Caspar and most people living in Bruges preferred Club Brugge (the blue soccer team) as opposed to Cercle Brugge (the green soccer team).

Ghent

Madalena in 3rd year of high school in Ghent.

Madalena in 3rd year of high school in Ghent.

After a decade of living in Bruges, my mother decided it would be best for us to move eastward for a better chance at receiving permanent residence papers and pursuing our higher education. Seeing that me and my siblings are close in age and were all soon about to embark upon another journey in our lives, my mother saw this as most fit. Being an introvert – at the time I didn’t have a word for the way I was, I just knew I had a hard time opening up and making friends – made it hard for me to be happy about moving to another town and changing schools. In hindsight it was one of the best decisions my mother made for our lives, some of the friends I made in my new school are still in my life today. But at the time I didn’t see it that way. One particular accident that stands out to me till this day is about my first days at the new school. I had moved from a Catholic school in Bruges to a public school in Ghent, the system was more relaxed for lack of a better word. In my former school we had to stand in line prior to entering our respective classrooms, in my new school we were allowed to get up about five minutes before the bell rang. We would then all huddle to the door and stand there for another five minutes, just chatting away. I dreaded this time, especially since I was new…and had a foreign accent. I had a West-Flemish accent, which differs significantly from an East-Flemish accent, even after living for a decade in Ghent (that is in East Flanders) my West-Flemish accent persists (as I was told during a recent job interview with a fellow West-Flemish man). The difference can be compared to that between Americans from the south and those further up north. Each time I tried uttering a word, laughter would ensue. I understood that they weren’t making fun of me, but rather laughing at my accent but try telling that to an awkward, shy, introverted, sole teenage black girl in the entire class. Nowadays I can laugh about it, and it gives nuance to our perspective of discrimination. A comedic one at that, which we can all use this day in age.

Madalena

Madalena Pedro Miala is a 29 year old who has been living in Belgium for over a quarter century. Her parents first came to Belgium to work at the Embassy of Angola, the country from which she hails. Five years later they decided to return to Angola following the cease-fire. Three years later the war resumed and the family were forced to leave Angola for Belgium, this time as refugees seeking permanent residence. My father stayed in Angola and shortly after we got news from our family that he was deceased. She grew up with my a brother and three sisters to whom she remains close. Next summer she is set to graduate with a Master of Arts in African Studies from Ghent University. Her long term dream is to be fluent in several languages, write for a living and be a walking billboard that harbors the potential of the African continent.

 

7th Annual Summer School on BLACK EUROPE

Thank you for the reminder Angela Shaw. Every year I say I am going to take this course one summer. I have to ensure that it comes to pass.

Black Europe

7th Annual Summer School on Black Europe
Interrogating Citizenship, Race and Ethnic Relations

Amsterdam, Netherlands – June 23 – July 4, 2014

The Summer School on Black Europe is an intensive two week course offered in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. The 7th annual Summer School on Black Europe will take place from June 23rd to July 4th, 2014 in Amsterdam (The Netherlands) in collaboration with The Center of Study and Investigation for Global Dialogues (Barcelona, Spain).*

The Summer School on Black Europe will be held at:

International Institute for Research and Education (IIRE)
Lombokstraat 40, 1094 AL Amsterdam, The Netherlands

APPLY HERE

The overall goal of this course is to examine the contemporary circumstances of the African Diaspora (and “other” immigrants of color) in Europe. We will focus on and discuss the origins of Black Europe and investigate the impact of these legacies on policies, social organizations and legislation today. This course will begin with a historical overview of the African Diaspora in Europe that traces the involvement of European nations in the colonization of the Americas. We will address the migration and settlement of Blacks in Europe, and examine immigration and citizenship laws that regulated their settlement. We will also look at anti-discrimination laws as they have arisen in various European countries. We compare the history of regulation and management of race and ethnic relations and the discourse surrounding the concept of Blackness and self-identification. Historically, social forces and social movements within Europe have given rise to policies to combat racism. We will trace the chain of events following social and civil conflicts that prompted these policies and analyze the legislative and intellectual discourse produced in the aftermath. In addition, we will explore notions of Blackness as official categorization; as a social construction employed by the dominant groups to indicate (non) belonging; as a Diaspora living within Europe; and as a contestation of the dominant (White) paradigm. In this way, we examine the social mobilization of Blacks to resist domination.

The above issues will be considered in light of the immediacy of contemporary global and European forces, including competing issues and discourses on Islamophobia, increased non-Black migration into and across Europe, and the debt crisis in the European Union.

This course will also seek to address the dimensions of race and ethnic relations that are unique to Europe; examining the ways in which conceptions of the “other” are institutionalized and reproduced; the rise of xenophobia in various EU countries; issues such as global racisms, everyday racism and epistemic racism; the legal definitions and discourse surrounding the conceptualized “other”; and examining the ways in which each country has dealt with issues of race and national identity. To this effect guest speakers for the 2013 program will be drawn from Germany, Italy and Portugal for case studies in those countries.

Affiliated Faculty Members include:

  • DR. MARTA ARAUJO, UNIVERSITY OF COIMBRA (PORTUGAL)
  • DR. PHILOMENA ESSED, ANTIOCH UNIVERSITY
  • DR. JEANETTE DAVIDSON, UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA
  • DR. DAVID THEO GOLDBERG, UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA HUMANITIES RESEARCH INSTITUTE
  • DR. RAMON GROSFOGUEL, UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY
  • DR. DIENKE HONDIUS, VRIJE UNIVERSITEIT AMSTERDAM
  • DR. KWAME NIMAKO, UNIVERSITEIT VAN AMSTERDAM
  • DR. STEPHEN SMALL, UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY
  • DR. MELISSA F. WEINER, COLLEGE OF THE HOLY CROSS
  • DR. GLORIA WEKKER, UNIVERSITEIT VAN UTRECHT
  • DONNA DRIVER-ZWARTKRUIS, VRIJE UNIVERSITEIT

(More Faculty Info)

 

Tuition

The tuition for this course is € 1600 (or € 1300 without housing) .

Tuition includes housing, the opening reception, lunches on all class days, weekly get-togethers with faculty, a course reader, a public transportation pass, and travel costs and entrance to museums and exhibitions during excursions (excluding an optional excursion to Paris).

The Paris excursion includes participation in a workshop on Migration and Social Movements at the Maison des Sciences de l’Homme (MSH) in Paris.

Tuition does not include travel to and from Amsterdam.

For more information over the Summer School, please email:
blackeurope [at] dialogoglobal.com

K. Nimako, Director
Email: obee [at] telfort.nl

Mano Delea, Project Manager
Email: mano.delea [at] gmail.com

Camilla Hawthorne, Coordinator North America
Email: camilla.hawthorne [at] Berkeley.edu

Giovanni Picker, Coordinator East/Central Europe & Russia
Email: giovanni.picker [at] gmail.com

APPLICATION

About the Center

Logo Dialogo Global

DIÀLEG GLOBAL –

DIÀLEG GLOBAL (Center of Study and Investigation for Global Dialogues) is a non-profit and non-governmental organization promoting research, knowledge-making, education (through seminars, workshops, exhibits, round-tables discussions, publications and video-making) and public policy to invent and work towards non-competitive horizons of life, of socio-economic organization and international relations. Non-profit and non-governmental organizations emerge from within civil and political society to address issues that are not supported or attended to by government and corporations. Their function is crucial in building futures that are beyond the regulations of States or the needs of the Corporations. In order for civil and political society to become relevant actors in social transformation and pointing out the limits of corporate values and state regulation, it is necessary to create institutions of knowledge-making not at the service of the state or corporations, but to the benefit of the civil society.

For further inquiries and information, please send e-mail to blackeurope [at] dialogoglobal.com.
Find us also on Facebook!

During the Summer School, we will also be hosting the International Symposium on Black Europe 2014. The 2013 Symposium on Black Europe was titled, Inside Black Europe: Racial Configurations in the Post 9/11 Era (in Europe). Click here for information on the 2012 Symposium.

 

* Previous sessions of the Summer School on Black Europe were organized in Amsterdam, in collaboration with the University of Amsterdam, the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam and NiNsee, the National Institute for the study of Dutch Slavery and its Legacy.

Black Pete, Zwarte Piet: The Documentary

According to folklore, Sinterklaas arrives in the Netherlands via steamship every November, rides into town on his horse, and is assisted by his helper Zwarte Piet, which literally translates to “Black Peter.”

Black Pete, Zwarte Piet: The Documentary is a film about the blackface tradition of Zwarte Piet, a Dutch folklore character associated with the celebration of Sinterklaas. According to folklore, Sinterklaas arrives in the Netherlands via steamship every November, rides into town on his horse, and is assisted by his helper Zwarte Piet, which literally translates to “Black Peter.”

Documentary project by

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Shantrelle P. Lewis

A 2012-13 Andy Warhol Curatorial Fellow, Shantrelle P. Lewis is Brooklyn-based curator and a New Orleans native who returned home to assist in the city’s post-Katrina revitalization efforts after a 12-year stint on the east coast. Having received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in African American Studies from Howard and Temple Universities, respectively, her extensive travels throughout Africa, Europe, the United States, South America, and the Caribbean has allowed Shantrelle to experience and witness the manifestation of the African Diasporan aesthetic firsthand. As a curator, Ms. Lewis uses exhibition to respond critically to socio-political and cosmological phenomena through an African-centered lens. Since 2011, Shantrelle has been engaged in research in the Netherlands and the Dutch Caribbean for a 2015 exhibition at Caribbean Cultural Center African Diaspora Institute (CCCADI).

Support fundraising for documentary on Kickstarter.