Race and Resistance across Borders in the Long Twentieth Century event-May 22 in Oxford

 Race and Resistance across Borders in the Long Twentieth Century event May 22 in Oxford

Launched in January 2013, the Race and Resistance network brings together researchers in the history, literature, and culture of anti-racist movements in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Europe, Latin America, the United States, and beyond.

We meet every Friday during term-time, with sessions taking a variety of formats, including lectures by invited speakers, short research presentations, seminars discussing pre-circulated texts from a range of disciplines, book launches, and film screenings.

All are welcome to attend.

The interdisciplinary research group ‘Race and Resistance across Borders in the Long Twentieth Century’ brings together researchers in the history, literature and culture of anti-racist movements in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Europe, Latin America, the United States, and beyond.

Events will take place in the TORCH Seminar Room, 3rd Floor of the Radcliffe Humanities Building, Oxford University (unless otherwise stated), and lunch will be provided at the lunchtime meetings.

22nd May, 12.45 – 2pm:

Research presentations by members of the ‘Race and Resistance’ network

Zainab Alsayegh (English): ‘Opacity and Interstiality in the Autobiography’

Ed Dodson (English): ‘Postimperial British Fiction: The Legacy of Empire and the Racial Categorisation of Authors’

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Black Women Bloggers – England 16 – Afroblush

afroblush copy5 Black Women Bloggers   England 16   Afroblush

Hello!

My name is Louisa, I’m a Ugandan currently living in London and the creator and voice behind Afroblush, an online extension of my cultural experiences and interests.  Since 2010, I’ve been nurturing this blog as a platform to celebrate, share and explore African culture, innovation and its growing potential. 

Behind the blog, I work in brand and consumer research, consulting for businesses and brands expanding into Sub-Sahara Africa. I also contribute to Impact Magazine, Arise News, Dazed and Confused, BBC Radio 2, BBC Three and Cosmopolitan Magazine, among others. 

My tales as an Afropean

I often described myself as an Afropean, as I was born in Uganda, brought up in London and travel to countries in both Africa and Europe quite frequently.

I have a strong connection with my African heritage, and even through my accent, disposition and even banter is dominantly English by nature. I will always describe myself as Ugandan, even though a large part of me is British too.

Creativity and culture, in around Sub-Saharan Africa

African fashion and design is creating its own mainstream, setting its own standards, opening its own doors and is no longer being influenced, but is now the influence.

Afroblush continuously promotes Africa as having provided one of the richest sources of imagery for designers. Going as far back as the 19th century and remaining a source of traditional and new age style and inspiration, expressive in the vitality of modern life within both urban and rural environments.

It goes without saying that Africa is truly rising, and alongside rising incomes, confidence and pride is rising too.  It’s exciting to see both domestic businesses and global brands creating products for global Pan-African communities region-specific features, elements and quirks as possible.

A spotlight on women of colour

The range of cosmetics for women (and men) of colour has grown tremendously in the last decade but is still inadequate, by comparison to the offerings of other ethnicities. Therefore, the products, tools and education on maintaining skin and hair care are still respectively limited, and somehow, in the war against variety, women of colour are seemingly becoming a nation divided by our choices.

Black British women spend six times more than white women on hair products that cater to their needs, pointing to incredible profit potential. As brands marketing their products to women of colour grow, we encourage them to cater to our and concerns rather than capitalising on our differences.

It’s time to tell our own stories

I pride my blog in providing entertaining and insightful updates and interviews from leaders of FABA (For Us By Us), a concept that promotes innovation entrepreneurship and thought leadership in the form of fashion, music, design, technology, travel,business and community engagement.

If you have a story to tell or would like to get in touch, please don’t hesitate.

 Black Women Bloggers   England 16   Afroblush

Otherwise, for all editorial matters, submissions and contributions, or if you would just like to say hello, please drop me an email or tweet:

Louisa Kiwana

Creator

Email: louisa@afroblush.com , tweet me: @afroblush

 

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The Collegium for African American Research conference, Liverpool – Mobilising Memory: Creating African Atlantic Identities

Hat Tip: Angela Shaw

cropped cropped image 2 credit 300x117 The Collegium for African American Research conference, Liverpool   Mobilising Memory: Creating African Atlantic Identities

JUNE 24-28 2015, LIVERPOOL UNITED KINGDOM

Liverpool is home to one of the oldest and largest Black British communities. The city itself has a chequered history as Britain’s largest slave port with a legacy of conflicted race relations. As one of the most important port cities of the Atlantic world, Liverpool grew financially rich on the proceeds. The city has also been enriched culturally through the role it has played in forming and framing black communities throughout the diaspora. Liverpool has itself been shaped by the cultures of this diaspora. The city’s rich musical culture (formed in part from African American roots) and vernacular energy give a unique and dynamic quality to discussions about cultural creativity. Its rich heritage, together with the vibrancy and malleability of Liverpool, have led CAAR to hold its 11th biannual conference on “Mobilising Memory: Creating African Atlantic Identities” at Liverpool Hope University.

Our conference recognises the importance of memory and memorialisation. We want to encourage papers about memory that see it as an active, ideological and often political process which communities and individual black subjects have used as a mobilising tool to counter hegemonic ideas and societal hierarchies in all areas of the African Atlantic and beyond. Papers can be about the physical action of mobility, addressing the long history of travel narratives in African Atlantic culture—including those where the experience is that of being “always elsewhere” (D’Aguiar)—or it can take mobilising as being more politically attuned and related to the way memory is used as a tool for changing consciousness and for creating homespace in the diaspora. The memory of slavery in the host city of Liverpool is so all-pervasive that its very bricks and mortar were said to be steeped in the blood of the trade. Activists both in the city and beyond have counteracted amnesia by mobilising culturally and politically against such wilful forgetting. The conference comes on the 50th Anniversary of Malcolm X’s final visit to Britain; his intervention in domestic and international racial politics during that sojourn is an exemplar of the local and global implications of memories of black presence creating new transnational realities in the face of global oppression.

CAAR2015@hope.ac.uk

CAAR Conference 2015
Liverpool Hope University
Hope Park
Liverpool
L16 9JD
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Registration and Accommodation

Registration is now open via the online store. Please ensure that you register under the correct category. Some categories are password protected; if you are a student and need a password and have not received one by 5pm today please email caar2015@hope.ac.uk with some proof that you are a student to request one.

In the registration process you will be able to reserve your on-campus accommodation, add on extras, and state any other additional requirements. If you wish to stay off-campus, please see the Visit Liverpool website for other accommodation. Two local off-campus hotels include the Childwall Abbey and the Penny Lane Hotel, both are walking distance to the conference.

General Registration: for all presenting and non-presenting delegates who are not students. Not password protected.

Student – not presenting: for all students who are not presenting a paper. Password protected, email us with some proof of you being a student to receive the password.

Student – presenting: for all students who are presenting a paper. Password protected, if you haven’t yet received a password please email us.

Hope post grads: for all Hope post grads. Password protected, email  us with proof you are a Hope student for a password.

Day rates: for all who are not attending the full conference. Not password protected.

About CAAR

The Collegium of African American Research (CAAR) was founded at the University of the Sorbonne Nouvelle in 1992 and incorporated at the University of Rome later that year. From its inception it has worked to stimulate research in African American Studies in Europe and beyond. CAAR promotes intellectual collaboration through the creation of an international and interdisciplinary research and teaching network. CAAR organizes bi-annual conferences, sponsors local symposia, helps to create research networks, and supports publications, most prominently its FORECAAST Series (Forum for European Contributions in African American Studies).

The first volume of the FORECAAST series was issued by Lit Verlag in 1999, and for its twentieth volume, the series moved to the University of Liverpool Press. Begun as an occasional publication of monographs and themed, selected conference papers, the Series has always sought to highlight the best recent scholarship in the field. In 2013, FORECAAST became an annual publication of CAAR, reflecting the growth of the organisation and the richness of the scholarship produced by its members.

CAAR is a financially independent, international organization of African-American and Black Diaspora scholars from over 25 countries, including the US, Canada, Japan, China, several African countries and all European countries. Members come from a range of disciplines including literature, history, cultural studies, film studies, social sciences, as well as from queer studies and gender studies.

The membership is made up equally of professors, students, and individual researchers and activists outside the academy. Due to the location of the current presidency, CAAR activities are primarily run out of University of Bremen.

 

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Race and Resistance across Borders in the Long Twentieth Century – May 8 event in Oxford

 Race and Resistance across Borders in the Long Twentieth Century   May 8 event in Oxford

Launched in January 2013, the Race and Resistance network brings together researchers in the history, literature, and culture of anti-racist movements in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Europe, Latin America, the United States, and beyond.

We meet every Friday during term-time, with sessions taking a variety of formats, including lectures by invited speakers, short research presentations, seminars discussing pre-circulated texts from a range of disciplines, book launches, and film screenings.

All are welcome to attend.

The interdisciplinary research group ‘Race and Resistance across Borders in the Long Twentieth Century’ brings together researchers in the history, literature and culture of anti-racist movements in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Europe, Latin America, the United States, and beyond.

Events will take place in the TORCH Seminar Room, 3rd Floor of the Radcliffe Humanities Building, Oxford University (unless otherwise stated), and lunch will be provided at the lunchtime meetings.

8th May, 12.30 – 2.30pm: (**please note change of time and place)

Film screening of When Voices Rise, followed by discussion with civil rights activist, Dr Kingsley Tweed.

Eccles Room, Pembroke College

When Voices Rise is a 2002 documentary focusing on the civil rights movement in Bermuda and the struggle to end segregation in the 1950s. The film was directed by Errol Williams and features an interview with Dr Kingsley Tweed, founder of Bermuda’s Black Brotherhood.

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Race and Resistance across Borders in the Long Twentieth Century – May 1 event in Oxford

 Race and Resistance across Borders in the Long Twentieth Century   May 1 event in Oxford

Launched in January 2013, the Race and Resistance network brings together researchers in the history, literature, and culture of anti-racist movements in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Europe, Latin America, the United States, and beyond.

We meet every Friday during term-time, with sessions taking a variety of formats, including lectures by invited speakers, short research presentations, seminars discussing pre-circulated texts from a range of disciplines, book launches, and film screenings.

All are welcome to attend.

The interdisciplinary research group ‘Race and Resistance across Borders in the Long Twentieth Century’ brings together researchers in the history, literature and culture of anti-racist movements in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Europe, Latin America, the United States, and beyond.

Events will take place in the TORCH Seminar Room, 3rd Floor of the Radcliffe Humanities Building, Oxford University (unless otherwise stated), and lunch will be provided at the lunchtime meetings.

Week 1:    1st May  (12.45  – 2pm):

A discussion, led by members of CRAE (Campaign for Racial Awareness and Equality), exploring the lessons in curriculum reform that can be learnt from other institutions.

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