Barbados born Marvo Straughn from Lewisham tells us how she came up with the idea of her business of Caribbean Baby Foods.

How we started

I had a dream I was in a supermarket with my baby son Andrew who was in his buggy and he wanted me to buy some cornmeal porridge, (which is a traditional dish in the Caribbean). I looked at the shelves in the baby isle, but could not see any, then I woke up, and suddenly the idea came to me. I then told my other 2 children Roxanne and Toni that I will go to some shops to check out the varieties of baby foods, and was surprised to find there were were no Caribbean recipes available. Now my dream has become a reality.

After realising there was a demand for Caribbean baby food and no one producing it. Marvo experimented with some recipes trying them out on family and friends. She started selling them in Lewisham market where she found a great demand for the Caribbean recipes. Since then Marvo has approached local retailers, schools, nurseries and hospitals and has had a great response.

Background

 Barbados born Marvo Straughn from Lewisham tells us how she came up with the idea of her business of Caribbean Baby Foods.

Marvo Straughn and Prince Charles.

Marvo’s frozen baby foods are for babies from the age of 4 months plus, (stage 1). The recipes are formulated using the finest natural ingredients, ready for baby to eat. The products have a 12 month shelf life, and there are 5 delicious recipes available. The foods are lovingly handmade and once made, the foods are blast frozen, to seal in the goodness and flavours.

Marvo Foods contain no additives or preservatives. Currently 5 recipes are available:

Apple and Mango

Green Banana and Pumpkin

Sweet Potato and Carrot

Cornmeal Porridge

Cod and Plantain

Use Facebook to Comment on this Post

Social Justice, Human Rights, Mental Health Care & The UK’s African Caribbean Black British Diaspora community round table at the House of Lords

BMH UK community round table at the House of Lords

Social Justice, Human Rights, Mental Health Care & The UK’s African Caribbean Black British Diaspora

Date:                     Monday 16th March 

Time:                    11.00 – 1.00 pm 

Venue:                  House of Lords  – full details will be emailed to registered delegates

To register:           email:events@blackmentalhealth.org.uk with ‘BMH UK House of Lord’s Community round table‘ in the subject header.

A pre-election community round table looking at the issues of social justice, human rights and mental health care and the UK’s African Caribbean Black British Diaspora is set to take place at the House of Lords this month, organised by human rights campaigns group Black Mental Health UK (BMH UK).

Hosted by race equality chief, Lord Herman Ouseley  this pre-election community round table event will take place on Monday 16th March 2015chaired by BMH UK’s director Matilda MacAttram.

In a bid to move away from the BME banner which has consistently seen key issues affecting black people from the UK’s African Caribbean communities sidelined at the expense of other groups, this meeting has been convened  for those from this community with a commitment to serve, agree on what the priorities that the political parities need to focus on in relation to black Briton in the run up to the May general election.

This meeting comes on the back of a BMH UK’s Harris Review round table, held in parliament in January this year, on the disturbing numbers of ‘self inflicted’ of young people in prison, in light of the mass incarceration of black Britons in this system. BMH UK convened this event because of their concerns over data which now shows that that there is now a greater disproportionality in the number of black people in prison in the UK than in the United States prison industrial complex.

Attendees at the event in January highlighted the need for a follow up meeting, where those who serve the community could agree on strategies that address the inequalities faced by those black Britons that come in contact the justice system, and other issues relating to the Diaspora  ahead of the general election.  This round table has been convened to facilitate this process and inform this agenda in the run up to the general election in May.

The primary focus of the meeting on the 16th May 2015 will be mental health as it relates to the Diaspora and also the justice system.

Matilda MacAttram, director of Black Mental Health UK said:

‘All the indexes show that it is people  from the UK’s African Caribbean Diaspora living in the UK are among society’s most economically and socially excluded groups.

They  have some of the worst experiences and poorest outcomes in the area of health, justice, education, employment or any other arena you care to look at,  and yet there have been numerous strategies over the decades that have been focussed on addressing the inequalities of BME communities, which  have consistently failed to improve the condition of this group.

It is important that we recognised this and prioritise the concerns of our communities if we are ever going to bring about positive change for those significant number of people who don’t have a voice, particularly in the area of mental health. It is clear that the BME banner doesn’t work for us, we urgently need to find solutions that do.’

Use Facebook to Comment on this Post

Celebrating International Women’s Day 2015

e6f45ba700 ad%2015 01 Celebrating International Women’s Day 2015

Celebrating International Women’s Day 2015

Theme: The important role of women in national development

Date: Tuesday, 10 March 2015

Time: 6.15pm – 9.30pm

Venue: Radisson Blu Vanderbilt Hotel, 68-86 Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BT

Speakers:

Leisha Beardmore – A Sustainable Development & Human Rights Adviser at the United Nations, Gender Consultant for the Hague & the Department for International Development (DfID)

Amina Salihu – Co-Director Nigerian Women’s Trust Fund

Dr Yvonne Thompson CBE - President of the European Federation of Black Women Business Owners and Author of 7 Traits of highly successful women on Boards

Bola Fatimilehin – Head of Diversity at the Royal Academy of Engineering

Admission: £8 in advance/a limited number of tickets will be on sale at the door £10.

All guests must pre-register to attend.

Register online HERE.

Men and Women are welcome to attend

Use Facebook to Comment on this Post

Ingrid Pollard’s work on display at Staying Power: Photographs of Black British Experience 1950s-1990s

Source: V&A Museum

Ingrid Pollard

w290 Ingrid Pollards work on display at Staying Power: Photographs of Black British Experience 1950s 1990s

Ingrid Pollard, from the series ‘Self Evident’. Museum no. E.327-2013. © Ingrid Pollard/ Victoria and Albert Museum, London. Supported by the National Lottery through the Heritage Lottery Fund.

Ingrid Pollard was born in Georgetown, Guyana in 1953 and moved to England when she was four years old. Since then she has lived in London working as a photographer, printer, media artist and researcher. She is a graduate of the London College of Printing and Derby University. In the 1980s she was part of a group of black British women artists who exhibited their work together in exhibitions like The Thin Black Line at the ICA in 1985. Pollard was also part of significant collaborative ventures between black British photographers, including Polareyes, D-Max and the Association of Black Photographers (now Autograph ABP), of which she was a founding member.

Pollard became interested in photography when she took her father’s box camera on a camping trip. Some of her first photographs were of the sewage works and wood yards along the Lee Valley Canal, taken as part of an O-Level geography project. Pollard defines her work as ‘a social practice concerned with representation, history and landscape with reference to race, difference and the materiality of lens based media.’ Her photographic series such as Pastoral Interlude (1988) and Self Evident (1995) depict black figures in rural landscape settings.

See Pollards work on display at the V&A Museum in London.

Display: 16 February 2015 – 24 May 2015. Staying Power: Photographs of Black British Experience 1950s-1990s is a project to increase the number of black British photographers and images of black Britain in the V&A collection. It aims to raise awareness of the contribution of black Britons to British culture and society, as well as to the art of photography.

Use Facebook to Comment on this Post

Photographer Jennie Baptiste on display – Staying Power: Photographs of Black British Experience 1950s-1990s

Source V&A Museum

Jennie Baptiste

w290 Photographer Jennie Baptiste on display     Staying Power: Photographs of Black British Experience 1950s 1990s

Jennie Baptiste, ‘Ragga Crouching’, 1993. Museum no. E.973-2010. © Jennie Baptiste/ Victoria and Albert Museum, London. Supported by the National Lottery through the Heritage Lottery Fund.

Photographer Jennie Baptiste was born in Northwest London in 1971, after her parents moved to the city from the Caribbean island of St. Lucia in the 1960s. She graduated from the London College of Communication Bachelor of Arts Photography course in 1994. Her photographs explore fashion and style as expressions of black British identity, often with a focus on music culture. She has photographed prominent hip hop artists such as P. Diddy, Jay Z and Mary J. Blige. Her work has been exhibited internationally and a selection of her photographs were included in the Black British Style exhibition held at the V&A in 2004.

See Jennie Baptiste’s work at the V&A Museum in London.

Display: 16 February 2015 – 24 May 2015. Staying Power: Photographs of Black British Experience 1950s-1990s is a project to increase the number of black British photographers and images of black Britain in the V&A collection. It aims to raise awareness of the contribution of black Britons to British culture and society, as well as to the art of photography.

pixel Photographer Jennie Baptiste on display     Staying Power: Photographs of Black British Experience 1950s 1990s

Use Facebook to Comment on this Post