A multimedia feature film about Gentrification in Brixton and South London

Hat tip: Babz Rawls

A Moving Image : A Film about Gentrification

 A multimedia feature film about Gentrification in Brixton and South London

Tanya Fear

Storyline

A Moving Image is a multimedia feature film about Gentrification in Brixton, incorporating fiction, documentary and performance art.

We follow Nina, a young stifled artist as she returns to her community after a long absence – she is soon painted as a symbol of gentrification and struggles with her complicity.

She forms a three-way relationship with an actor called Mickey and a Nigerian performance artist called Ayo, who both have very different views on the changes taking place in their environment.

During an unnaturally hot summer in London, Nina sets out to create the ultimate piece of art to explore her complex relationship with her community.

In doing so, she poses a tricky question – is she truly part of the problem or can she use her work to be part of the solution?

On her journey, she interviews real members of the community who have been affected by Gentrification, blurring the line between reality and fiction.

Trailer

Producer

Screen Shot 2014 12 11 at 10.30.34 A multimedia feature film about Gentrification in Brixton and South London

Rienkje Attoh

Rienkje Attoh is a National Film and Television School (NFTS) graduate. While at the school she produced a mix of fiction (The Agreement, The Earth Belongs To No One), animation (Banaroo) and documentary (The Pink House) shorts. She has also co-produced (Hen Pecked), and is currently developing a slate of her productions.
She is one of the three inaugural Prince William scholars supported by BAFTA and Warner Bros. She is mentored by Christine Langan, the head of BBC Films and Chris Law at Warner Bros.

Rienkje has over seven years broadcast experience. She started her career as a journalist at BBC South West in 2006, moving on to produce news and current affairs programmes for TV. In 2009 she moved to BBC London where she produced numerous radio programmes, including The Late Show with Nikki Bedi. She has also worked as a production journalist for ITN and voice artist for Euronews.

Cast

tanya1  242x300 A multimedia feature film about Gentrification in Brixton and South London

Tanya Fear

Tanya Fear is a London based actress. She is currently shooting a 10 episode Canal+ crime drama called “Spotless”. She has starred in TV shows such as “Some Girls” The Midnight Beast and upcoming BBC1 comedy Boomers. She is passionate about film and theatre and starred in hit African comedy “The Epic Adventure of Nhamo the Manyika Warrior and his Sexy Wife Chipo” at the Tricycle Theatre. She also starred in US summer blockbuster “Kick Ass 2”.

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Jamelia is one of ITV’s Loose Women

medium CLBsF3b8jQAs2BQHfQ0zTDFjLz nnBt 7jT7UyUAt4k Jamelia is one of ITVs Loose Women

Jamelia has over 1.7 million album sales with 7 top 10 hits from her album Thank You including Superstar, Thank You and her co-write with Chris Martin, See It In A Boy’s Eyes. Jamelia stormed the top 10 again with Stop, her signature track for the second Bridget Jones film. Jamelia’s has also seen success in Europe, Australia and New Zealand where she reached No 1.

Winner of four MOBO awards, including Best UK Act and Best British Female, she has performed at the MOBOS and co-hosted the awards in 2007.

The Superstar singer has also worked with brands including Pretty Polly, Reebok and has fronted her own ethnic hair care range called Model.Me. endorsed byToni&Guy. Jamelia has also been the cover girl for Harpers and Queen, Cosmopolitan and Elle magazine.

Jamelia has authored her own BBC3 documentary and fronted the Channel 4 show, The House that Made Me. She alsostarred on the judging panel of BBC3’s Move Like Michael Jackson. Jamelia is currently starring as one of the judges on The Voice of Ireland.

Find out more about Jamelia in her Q&A:

I’m best known for: Singing a few songs and my big mouth

The proudest moment of my career is: Performing for and having dinner with Nelson Mandela

The first thing I do in the morning is: Check my twitter (@jameliatweeties if you’re interested)

My favourite lunch is: A chipotle burrito – thankfully they don’t have them in Birmingham or I’d be a beached whale!

The most famous person in my phonebook is: Naomi Campbell

The actress who would play me in a film about my life is: Kerry Washington, because I love her!

My favourite memory from working on Loose Women is: Having two people I know and love on my first show – Biggins and Ben Miller

If I wasn’t presenting Loose Women, I’d be: Eating and sleeping, so basically you’ve saved my life!

You’d be surprised to learn that: I am obsessed with Christmas songs

The one thing I couldn’t live without is: My two daughters and chocolate

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Race and Resistance across Borders in the Long Twentieth Century event – June 5th in Oxford

 Race and Resistance across Borders in the Long Twentieth Century event   June 5th in Oxford

Launched in January 2013, the Race and Resistance network brings together researchers in the history, literature, and culture of anti-racist movements in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Europe, Latin America, the United States, and beyond.

We meet every Friday during term-time, with sessions taking a variety of formats, including lectures by invited speakers, short research presentations, seminars discussing pre-circulated texts from a range of disciplines, book launches, and film screenings.

All are welcome to attend.

The interdisciplinary research group ‘Race and Resistance across Borders in the Long Twentieth Century’ brings together researchers in the history, literature and culture of anti-racist movements in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Europe, Latin America, the United States, and beyond.

Events will take place in the TORCH Seminar Room, 3rd Floor of the Radcliffe Humanities Building, Oxford University (unless otherwise stated), and lunch will be provided at the lunchtime meetings.

5th June, 12.45 – 2pm: (Colin Matthew Room, ground floor of Radcliffe Humanities)

Research presentations by members of the ‘Race and Resistance’ network

Gaetan Maret (English): ‘Césaire’s 1939 Cahier d’un Retour au Pays Natal and black America’

Mai Musié (Classics): ‘Ethnic Identity in the Ancient Novel’

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June Sarpong is one of ITV’s Loose Women

medium jtlMjIdCAxyTm52lujWiVclPI4PC juc6C64jjkrp Y June Sarpong is one of ITVs Loose Women

Credit: ITV

 

June has enjoyed a 15-year career which has already seen her become one of the most recognizable faces of British television, as well as being one of the UK’s most intelligent and dynamic young hosts! So much so that HM The Queen awarded her an MBE in 2007 for her services to broadcasting and charity, making June one of the youngest people to receive the award.

Over the years she’s taken on the world’s most challenging live audiences: from hosting 2005’s major Make Poverty History event in London’s Trafalgar Square to presenting at the UK leg of Live Earth in 2007. In 2008 she even hosted Nelson Mandela’s 90th Birthday celebrations alongside Will Smith in front of 30,000 people at London’s Hyde Park!

As well as her broadcasting work June is also passionately involved with several charitable foundations having worked extensively with HRH Prince Charles for over a decade as an ambassador for his charity the Prince’s Trust, as well as campaigning for The One and Product (RED). And when she’s not busy doing any of that she’s working as Co-Founder of the WIE Network (Women:Inspiration & Enterprise).

After living in America for 8 years, June has recently moved back to her hometown of London and is thrilled to be joining the Loose team.

Find out more in her Q&A below:
I’m best known for: For presenting Nelson Mandela’s 90th Birthday Party in Hyde Park

The proudest moment of my career is: Interviewing Tony Blair and helping to encourage a generation of young people to vote

The first thing I do in the morning is: Go to the loo! After that mediate and pray

My favourite lunch is: Fried chicken

The most famous person in my phonebook is: Will Smith

The actor who would play me in a film about my life is: Wow, not sure. Probably Lupita Nyongo

If I wasn’t presenting Loose Women, I’d be: In my kitchen cooking up a storm. Like Ruth, I LOVE cooking

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Race and Resistance across Borders in the Long Twentieth Century event – May 29 in Oxford

 Race and Resistance across Borders in the Long Twentieth Century event   May 29 in Oxford

Launched in January 2013, the Race and Resistance network brings together researchers in the history, literature, and culture of anti-racist movements in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Europe, Latin America, the United States, and beyond.

We meet every Friday during term-time, with sessions taking a variety of formats, including lectures by invited speakers, short research presentations, seminars discussing pre-circulated texts from a range of disciplines, book launches, and film screenings.

All are welcome to attend.

The interdisciplinary research group ‘Race and Resistance across Borders in the Long Twentieth Century’ brings together researchers in the history, literature and culture of anti-racist movements in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Europe, Latin America, the United States, and beyond.

Events will take place in the TORCH Seminar Room, 3rd Floor of the Radcliffe Humanities Building, Oxford University (unless otherwise stated), and lunch will be provided at the lunchtime meetings.

29th May, 5pm: (**please note change to time)

Chaired by Tiziana Morosetti (University of Oxford), the round table discusses contemporary attempts to re-enact ‘human zoos’ and their artistic politics after the much-criticised and eventually cancelled performance of Brett Bailey’s Exhibit B at the Barbican in 2014. Are re-enactments of ‘human zoos’ useful/desirable? Do they effectively tackle racial politics? Are we, as one petition stated, justified in censoring them when they risk being racially offensive?

The interdisciplinary research group ‘Race and Resistance across Borders in the Long Twentieth Century’ brings together researchers in the history, literature and culture of anti-racist movements in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Europe, Latin America, the United States, and beyond.

 

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Race and Resistance across Borders in the Long Twentieth Century event-May 22 in Oxford

 Race and Resistance across Borders in the Long Twentieth Century event May 22 in Oxford

Launched in January 2013, the Race and Resistance network brings together researchers in the history, literature, and culture of anti-racist movements in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Europe, Latin America, the United States, and beyond.

We meet every Friday during term-time, with sessions taking a variety of formats, including lectures by invited speakers, short research presentations, seminars discussing pre-circulated texts from a range of disciplines, book launches, and film screenings.

All are welcome to attend.

The interdisciplinary research group ‘Race and Resistance across Borders in the Long Twentieth Century’ brings together researchers in the history, literature and culture of anti-racist movements in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Europe, Latin America, the United States, and beyond.

Events will take place in the TORCH Seminar Room, 3rd Floor of the Radcliffe Humanities Building, Oxford University (unless otherwise stated), and lunch will be provided at the lunchtime meetings.

22nd May, 12.45 – 2pm:

Research presentations by members of the ‘Race and Resistance’ network

Zainab Alsayegh (English): ‘Opacity and Interstiality in the Autobiography’

Ed Dodson (English): ‘Postimperial British Fiction: The Legacy of Empire and the Racial Categorisation of Authors’

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Black Women Bloggers – England 16 – Afroblush

afroblush copy5 Black Women Bloggers   England 16   Afroblush

Hello!

My name is Louisa, I’m a Ugandan currently living in London and the creator and voice behind Afroblush, an online extension of my cultural experiences and interests.  Since 2010, I’ve been nurturing this blog as a platform to celebrate, share and explore African culture, innovation and its growing potential. 

Behind the blog, I work in brand and consumer research, consulting for businesses and brands expanding into Sub-Sahara Africa. I also contribute to Impact Magazine, Arise News, Dazed and Confused, BBC Radio 2, BBC Three and Cosmopolitan Magazine, among others. 

My tales as an Afropean

I often described myself as an Afropean, as I was born in Uganda, brought up in London and travel to countries in both Africa and Europe quite frequently.

I have a strong connection with my African heritage, and even through my accent, disposition and even banter is dominantly English by nature. I will always describe myself as Ugandan, even though a large part of me is British too.

Creativity and culture, in around Sub-Saharan Africa

African fashion and design is creating its own mainstream, setting its own standards, opening its own doors and is no longer being influenced, but is now the influence.

Afroblush continuously promotes Africa as having provided one of the richest sources of imagery for designers. Going as far back as the 19th century and remaining a source of traditional and new age style and inspiration, expressive in the vitality of modern life within both urban and rural environments.

It goes without saying that Africa is truly rising, and alongside rising incomes, confidence and pride is rising too.  It’s exciting to see both domestic businesses and global brands creating products for global Pan-African communities region-specific features, elements and quirks as possible.

A spotlight on women of colour

The range of cosmetics for women (and men) of colour has grown tremendously in the last decade but is still inadequate, by comparison to the offerings of other ethnicities. Therefore, the products, tools and education on maintaining skin and hair care are still respectively limited, and somehow, in the war against variety, women of colour are seemingly becoming a nation divided by our choices.

Black British women spend six times more than white women on hair products that cater to their needs, pointing to incredible profit potential. As brands marketing their products to women of colour grow, we encourage them to cater to our and concerns rather than capitalising on our differences.

It’s time to tell our own stories

I pride my blog in providing entertaining and insightful updates and interviews from leaders of FABA (For Us By Us), a concept that promotes innovation entrepreneurship and thought leadership in the form of fashion, music, design, technology, travel,business and community engagement.

If you have a story to tell or would like to get in touch, please don’t hesitate.

 Black Women Bloggers   England 16   Afroblush

Otherwise, for all editorial matters, submissions and contributions, or if you would just like to say hello, please drop me an email or tweet:

Louisa Kiwana

Creator

Email: louisa@afroblush.com , tweet me: @afroblush

 

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