Moira Stuart – the first African-Caribbean female newsreader on British television

Moira Clare Ruby Stuart OBE is a British presenter, who was the first African-Caribbean female newsreader on British television. She has presented many television news and radio programmes for the BBC and is currently the newsreader for The Chris Evans Breakfast Show on BBC Radio 2.

Moira Stuart
Moira Stuart
Source: BBC

Source: BBC

Moira Stuart’s career in radio and television spans more than two decades. She started her BBC career as a production assistant in Radio’s Talks and Documentaries department in the 1970s , before moving on to become a BBC Radio 4 announcer and a newsreader and programme presenter. Moira moved to television news in 1981 to become the first female African-Caribbean newsreader, presenting every type of BBC News bulletin before leaving in 2007.

Moira has presented many programmes on radio and television including Best Of Jazz on Radio 2, BBC1’s The Holiday Programme, Have I Got News For You! in 2007, and her documentary Moira Stuart in Search of Wilberforce. BBC One’s successful documentary series Who Do You Think You Are? featured Moira in 2004, and she made a memorable appearance as herself in Extras in 2006 .

She has won numerous awards including the TV and Radio Industries Club Best Newscaster awards and the Women Of Achievement Television Personality award, she was awarded an OBE in 2001, and she received an Honorary Doctorate from the University of Edinburgh in 2006.

Moira has served on various boards and judging panels including Amnesty International, The Royal Television Society, BAFTA, United Nations Association, the London Fair Play Consortium, the Human Genetics Advisory Commission, the Orange Prize for Literature, the BUPA Communications Panel, the IVCA and the Queen’s Anniversary Prize, and the Grierson Trust.

Ingrid Pollard’s work on display at Staying Power: Photographs of Black British Experience 1950s-1990s

Source: V&A Museum

Ingrid Pollard

Ingrid Pollard
Ingrid Pollard, from the series ‘Self Evident’. Museum no. E.327-2013. © Ingrid Pollard/ Victoria and Albert Museum, London. Supported by the National Lottery through the Heritage Lottery Fund.

Ingrid Pollard was born in Georgetown, Guyana in 1953 and moved to England when she was four years old. Since then she has lived in London working as a photographer, printer, media artist and researcher. She is a graduate of the London College of Printing and Derby University. In the 1980s she was part of a group of black British women artists who exhibited their work together in exhibitions like The Thin Black Line at the ICA in 1985. Pollard was also part of significant collaborative ventures between black British photographers, including Polareyes, D-Max and the Association of Black Photographers (now Autograph ABP), of which she was a founding member.

Pollard became interested in photography when she took her father’s box camera on a camping trip. Some of her first photographs were of the sewage works and wood yards along the Lee Valley Canal, taken as part of an O-Level geography project. Pollard defines her work as ‘a social practice concerned with representation, history and landscape with reference to race, difference and the materiality of lens based media.’ Her photographic series such as Pastoral Interlude (1988) and Self Evident (1995) depict black figures in rural landscape settings.

See Pollards work on display at the V&A Museum in London.

Display: 16 February 2015 – 24 May 2015. Staying Power: Photographs of Black British Experience 1950s-1990s is a project to increase the number of black British photographers and images of black Britain in the V&A collection. It aims to raise awareness of the contribution of black Britons to British culture and society, as well as to the art of photography.

Photographer Jennie Baptiste on display – Staying Power: Photographs of Black British Experience 1950s-1990s

Source V&A Museum

Jennie Baptiste

Jennie Baptiste
Jennie Baptiste, ‘Ragga Crouching’, 1993. Museum no. E.973-2010. © Jennie Baptiste/ Victoria and Albert Museum, London. Supported by the National Lottery through the Heritage Lottery Fund.

Photographer Jennie Baptiste was born in Northwest London in 1971, after her parents moved to the city from the Caribbean island of St. Lucia in the 1960s. She graduated from the London College of Communication Bachelor of Arts Photography course in 1994. Her photographs explore fashion and style as expressions of black British identity, often with a focus on music culture. She has photographed prominent hip hop artists such as P. Diddy, Jay Z and Mary J. Blige. Her work has been exhibited internationally and a selection of her photographs were included in the Black British Style exhibition held at the V&A in 2004.

See Jennie Baptiste’s work at the V&A Museum in London.

Display: 16 February 2015 – 24 May 2015. Staying Power: Photographs of Black British Experience 1950s-1990s is a project to increase the number of black British photographers and images of black Britain in the V&A collection. It aims to raise awareness of the contribution of black Britons to British culture and society, as well as to the art of photography.

British Jamaican photographer Maxine Walker – on exhibit at the London’s V & A

Source: V & A

Maxine Walker

Maxine Walker
Maxine Walker, from the series ‘Untitled’, 1995. Museum no. E.303-2013. © Maxine Walker / Autograph ABP/ Victoria and Albert Museum, London. Supported by the National Lottery through the Heritage Lottery Fund.

Born in 1962, British Jamaican photographer Maxine Walker lives and works in Birmingham. Her photographs raise questions about the nature of identity, challenging racial stereotypes. She contests photography’s documentary ability by replicating specific photographic styles, such as in her early series Auntie Linda’s House (1987). Her Black Beauty series from the 1980s and her untitled series for the ‘Self Evident’ exhibition in 1995 both utilise self-portraiture.

See her work at the Victoria & Albert Museum in London

Display: 16 February 2015 – 24 May 2015. Staying Power: Photographs of Black British Experience 1950s-1990s is a project to increase the number of black British photographers and images of black Britain in the V&A collection. It aims to raise awareness of the contribution of black Britons to British culture and society, as well as to the art of photography.

A Day in Brussels – Meeting Minister Cecile Kyenge, Italy

BEWC premeeting
From left: Light Up a Girl’s Life project manager with Members of the Black European Women’s Council at the EESC.

With roots stemming back to 2007 with The Vienna Declaration the Black European Women’s Council (BEWC) is set to revive itself. The first step was a face-to-face meeting with some of the board members representing Austria, Italy, Sweden and the United Kingdom.

Meeting with MEP Kyenge
Talking with Minister Kyenge.

In addition to discussing the future of the BEWC we had the honor of meeting with Minister Kyenge, Italy, thanks to our Italian board member, Dr. Susanne Mbiye.

Minister Kyenge's award
Minister Kyenge’s Global Citizenship Award for her groundbreaking work on immigrant rights fro children in Italy.

Minister Kyenge has received global recognition for becoming the first black women in the Italian Parliament and for her position on granting citizenship to the children of immigrants born in Italy. She has also received verbal abuse from her colleagues in Italy.

With Miniter Kyenge
With Minister Kyenge. She is grace personified.

Despite her hectic schedule including plenary and other meetings that day Minister Kyenge greeted each one of us with a warm handshake and parted with a kiss on the cheek. She, I can attest, is grace personified.

8th Annual summer school on Black Europe

Now accepting applications for Black Europe Summer School Program 2015

June 22 – July 3, 2015, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Summer School on Black Europe

Now in its 8th year, the overall goal of this intensive two-week course is to examine the contemporary circumstances of the African Diaspora in Europe. We will focus on the historical and colonial legacies of European countries to discuss the origins of Black Europe and investigate the impact of these legacies on policies and legislation today.

This course addresses the dimensions of race and ethnic relations that are unique to Europe; examining the ways in which conceptions of the “other” are institutionalized and reproduced; the rise of xenophobia in various EU countries; issues such as global racisms, everyday racism, and epistemic racism; the legal definitions and discourse surrounding the conceptualized “other”; and examining the ways in which each country has dealt with issues of race and national identity. Issues of race, class, gender, and sexuality are central analytics, and scholars from the social sciences and humanities and NGOs working against racism and xenophobia in Europe are encouraged to apply.

Applications due February 1, 2015.

Visit our website for more information.

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Email anytime with further inquiries:

blackeurope@dialogoglobal.com

7th Annual Summer School on Black Europe: Interrogating Citizenship, Race and Ethnic Relations

Editor’s note: I am dying to take this course one summer. If you can attend and get accepted, I would live to hear about your experience, feedback on the course, and how you feel post-course.

Summer School on Black Europe

Amsterdam, Netherlands – June 23 – July 4, 2014

The Summer School on Black Europe is an intensive two week course offered in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. The 7th annual Summer School on Black Europe will take place from June 23rd to July 4th, 2014 in Amsterdam (The Netherlands) in collaboration with The Center of Study and Investigation for Global Dialogues (Barcelona, Spain).*

The Summer School on Black Europe will be held at:

International Institute for Research and Education (IIRE)
Lombokstraat 40, 1094 AL Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Apply Here

The overall goal of this course is to examine the contemporary circumstances of the African Diaspora (and “other” immigrants of color) in Europe. We will focus on and discuss the origins of Black Europe and investigate the impact of these legacies on policies, social organizations and legislation today. This course will begin with a historical overview of the African Diaspora in Europe that traces the involvement of European nations in the colonization of the Americas. We will address the migration and settlement of Blacks in Europe, and examine immigration and citizenship laws that regulated their settlement. We will also look at anti-discrimination laws as they have arisen in various European countries. We compare the history of regulation and management of race and ethnic relations and the discourse surrounding the concept of Blackness and self-identification. Historically, social forces and social movements within Europe have given rise to policies to combat racism. We will trace the chain of events following social and civil conflicts that prompted these policies and analyze the legislative and intellectual discourse produced in the aftermath. In addition, we will explore notions of Blackness as official categorization; as a social construction employed by the dominant groups to indicate (non) belonging; as a Diaspora living within Europe; and as a contestation of the dominant (White) paradigm. In this way, we examine the social mobilization of Blacks to resist domination.

The above issues will be considered in light of the immediacy of contemporary global and European forces, including competing issues and discourses on Islamophobia, increased non-Black migration into and across Europe, and the debt crisis in the European Union.

This course will also seek to address the dimensions of race and ethnic relations that are unique to Europe; examining the ways in which conceptions of the “other” are institutionalized and reproduced; the rise of xenophobia in various EU countries; issues such as global racisms, everyday racism and epistemic racism; the legal definitions and discourse surrounding the conceptualized “other”; and examining the ways in which each country has dealt with issues of race and national identity. To this effect guest speakers for the 2014 program will be drawn from Germany, Italy and Portugal for case studies in those countries.

Affiliated Faculty Members include:

  • Dr. Marta Araujo, University of Coimbra (Portugal)
  • Dr. Philomena Essed, Antioch University
  • Dr. Jeanette Davidson, University of Oklahoma
  • Dr. David Theo Goldberg, University of California Humanities Research Institute
  • Dr. Ramon Grosfoguel, University of California, Berkeley
  • Dr. Dienke Hondius, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam
  • Dr. Kwame Nimako, Universiteit van Amsterdam
  • Dr. Stephen Small, University of California, Berkeley
  • Dr. Melissa F. Weiner, College of the Holy Cross
  • Dr. Gloria Wekker, Universiteit van Utrecht
  • Dr. Donna Driver-Zwartkruis, Vrije Universiteit

(More Faculty Info)

Tuition

The tuition for this course is € 1600 (or € 1300 without housing) .

Tuition includes housing, the opening reception, lunches on all class days, weekly get-togethers with faculty, a course reader, a public transportation pass, and travel costs and entrance to museums and exhibitions during excursions.

The excursions are coordinated through Black Heritage Amsterdam Tours.

Tuition does not include travel to and from Amsterdam.

For more information over the Summer School, please email:
blackeurope [at] dialogoglobal.com

K. Nimako, Director
Email: obee [at] telfort.nl

Mano Delea, Project Manager
Email: mano.delea [at] gmail.com

Camilla Hawthorne, Coordinator North America
Email: camilla.hawthorne [at] Berkeley.edu

Giovanni Picker, Coordinator East/Central Europe & Russia
Email: giovanni.picker [at] gmail.com

APPLICATION