Notes from England: Black and Asian women are "missing" from almost a third of workplaces in areas with significant ethnic minority populations


As it releases the results of a two-year investigation, which reveals for the first time the full scale of the workplace penalties faced by Pakistani, Bangladeshi and Black Caribbean women, the Equal Opportunities Commission (EOC) is today calling for a fundamental cultural shift in the way black and Asian women are treated at work and by public policy makers.

Moving on Up: Ethnic Minority Women at Work, the largest investigation of its kind in Great Britain, has established that Pakistani, Bangladeshi and Black Caribbean women face significantly greater penalties than white women in the workplace. Those who want to work are finding it more difficult to get jobs, progress within them and are more likely to be segregated into certain types of work, despite leaving school with the same career aspirations as white girls and similar or better qualifications than white boys.

In areas with above average numbers of black and Asian women participating in the local labour market, BME women are entirely absent from 3 out of 10 workplaces and under-represented in almost 3 out of 5 workplaces. The EOC’s report suggests it’s not too late to set the country on a different course. 28% of employers surveyed said they intended to introduce steps to improve the recruitment and progression of black and Asian women. However, the same percentage said they were unsure what action to take.

The EOC is today urging Britain???s employers and policy makers to catch up with the diversity of modern Britain and develop ???cultural intelligence??? – the awareness, understanding and confidence to communicate and relate positively to people from different cultural backgrounds, to get the best from them at work and design policy that meets their needs.

The EOC warns that cultural intelligence is absolutely crucial if Britain is to avoid paying a high economic and social price. Between 2001 and 2020, ethnic minority people are expected to account for over 70% of the growth in the UK population aged 16-59. With Britain???s employers facing skills shortages, it is crucial to tap into a growing and increasingly well-qualified pool of young Pakistani, Bangladeshi and Black Caribbean women’s talent if we are to maintain economic growth.

And with access to jobs being a key ingredient of community cohesion, policy makers will fail to build stronger communities unless black and Asian women’s skills and ambitions translate into better-paid jobs in a wider range of organisations.

Read the entire press release here.

By the numbers:

Breakdown of Black Caribbean women in English cities (Sources: ONS (2004) Census 2001: CD Supplement to the National report for England and Wales; GROS (2004) Scotland???s Census 2001: CD 5 Volume 1.):

Birmingham: 25,700
Bradford: 1,500
Leeds: 3,600
Leicester: 2,500
London: 191,500
Manchester: 4,700

Black Business Community Magazine

Diane is doing something exciting in London:

On the 20th July my new online magazine went up. Its called the Black Business Community Magazine for businesses in London. I am currently giving away some free subscriptions for anyone who already has content they would like to include in the magazine.

I haven’t created a press release about this yet but one will be going out this week. The free offer is limited so please visit the site www.blackbusinesscommunitymagazine.net and take a look.

Also if you know of a business in London that may benefit please forward this to all your friends so that they can include their business.

This is a magazine for black businesses based in London who want to start using audio and video to promote their business. There is also space for text articles too.

I will be doing all of the promoting so this is an opportunity for extra business. The next 3 months will be spent doing nothing but promotional activities so get yourself in there now and thank you for sharing this with other black businesses.

London-Vivid Occasions & Sisters in Spirit Women’s Networking Event

Event start date 06/30/2007, 04:00 pm — 09:00 pm (local time)
City/Location London (United Kingdom)
Caxton House
129 St. John’s Way
Archway, Islington
London
N19 3RQ

Language(s) English
Description Vivid Occasions & Sisters in Spirit Women’s Networking Event

An event set to inspire the woman that you wish to become.

THIS EVENT WILL BE FILMED FOR TV BROADCAST
Join us to connect and exchange ideas with other like minded women. You will have the opportunity to view an exhibition of products and services of other women in business where you can treat yourself by doing some shopping. During dinner while you enjoy a delicious hot buffet and drinks you will get invaluable information from inspirational women.

Speed networking and 1 minute Pitch Sessions: Come ready with your ELEVATOR PITCH; you should be able to summarise your business in the time it takes you to get on & off an ELEVATOR. Describe what you do, who for, what you want & need from your audience & WHAT YOU HAVE TO OFFER. The one minute pitch will be limited to the first 20 ladies that request a slot.

Visit our Exchange Mart were you can put up what you have in Exchange for what you want!
There will also be enlightening workshops to attend on the day.
Take part in a prize draw to win fantastic prizes.

That???s not all! You will also get to take home a gorgeous goody bag you will love.

Ladies if you wish to Exhibit on the day please do call to reserve a space.
Who Attends: Our events are attended by a mixed & diverse range of professional women. Some are owners of small independent businesses & others are senior employees in the corporate sector. There is usually a mix of individuals from different industries. We believe this makes for a successful networking event. Everyone is welcome. Please forward to friends, who like you, are sophisticated, ambitious, professional, confident, & fun-loving.
Read the review from the previous inspired women event @ www.vividoccasions.com

VENUE: Caxton House
ENTRANCE: ??35.00 (incl dinner/drinks)
STAND: ??45.00 limited
BOOKING: RSVP on here. Payment needed by 20th May. We accept Paypal and Bank Transfer
Info: 07851711524, 07956151416, and 07958300168.
Email: info@vividoccasions.com . makosewe@hotmail.com

Go to www.vividoccasions.com to book now!

Some 17 years after "My Beautiful Laundrette", director Stephen Frears gives us another stunning cinematic portrait of London.


Frears’ 2002 film focuses on the usually unseen world of the capital’s illegal immigrants, the invisible people who keep its economy running smoothly.

Chiwetel Ejiofor’s Nigerian exile Okwe is one such person. By day he drives a minicab; at night he’s a porter in a hotel that’s home to some shady goings-on.

When Okwe stumbles upon the hotel’s dirty secret, he is placed in an impossible dilemma. A decent man, how can he do the right thing – given his precarious status – and still protect the people he cares about?

Interview with Frears:
When you make films about Britain, they’re always set among the working classes or, in this case, the under class. Why?

I just do scripts I like, it’s as simple as that. Although, I suppose I don’t find the idea of tea and cucumber sandwiches very interesting. That said, I was never asked to do “Four Weddings and a Funeral”, which I think is extremely good. I’ve never had to think about whether a film about the upper classes could be interesting.

You’ve discovered a brilliant new British leading man in Chiwetel Ejiofor. Would you take credit for that?

I was lucky. You think you’re going to get X and then you get 6X. But I wouldn’t want to be falsely innocent about it because I’ve done it quite a lot of times before. You just need to give people an opportunity. Daniel Day-Lewis knew, when he did “My Beautiful Laundrette”, that was what he’d been waiting for. That’s why he was so anxious to get the part. It was the same with Jack Black and “High Fidelity”.

You’ve said that the UK is being dragged, kicking and screaming, towards multiculturalism. Do you think we have become less accepting?

Parts of the UK are. I live in a multicultural part of London and it’s very interesting and I’m very pleased. I was politicised by Hanif Kureishi. My eyes were sort of opened for me when he wrote “My Beautiful Laundrette”. I was brought up in a completely white, middle class life. Since I opened up a little, it’s got much more interesting.

So why do you think some filmmakers seem reluctant to include ethnic characters in their work?

I don’t know, you’d have to ask them. I went to a lot of trouble to ethnically cleanse my film of all white people.


Source

Time Out London’s guide to Slave trade abolition commemoration events


London was the place where the movement to abolish slavery took root and this Sunday March 25 marks the 200th anniversary of the Abolition of Slavery Bill, passed on March 25 1807, forbidding the trade throughout the British Empire. While the country gears up to commemorate the bicentenary of this historic legislation, here’s a lowdown on how Londoners can both commemorate this landmark anniversary, and raise money for those around the world who continue to be blighted by the evils of slavery in the 21st century.


Read the comprehensive listings plus more related information.