Indra Rios-Moore in Denmark: Every story has a start, middle and an end.

Hat tip: Lorraine Spencer

71p9Zt6RnnL. SX425 PJautoripBadge,BottomRight,4, 40 OU11   Indra Rios Moore in Denmark: Every story has a start, middle and an end.

Indra Rios-Moore’s story begins on the Lower East Side of Manhattan, continues across the Atlantic in Denmark, but as yet has not come close to reaching a climax, or thankfully an ending. Like every good story it has had twists along the way, ups, as well as downs, joy and pain, but also sacrifice and success. If art reflects life then it is little wonder that Indra’s album, Heartland is eclecticism in the extreme…it is an album that is both intensely personal but also broad in its musical sweep. Hardly surprising given Indra’s story.

Indra, named by her mother after the Hindu warrior deity of the sky and the rain, was born to a Puerto Rican social worker, Elizabeth, and an African-American-Syrian jazz bassist, Donald Moore (his credits include, the New York Contemporary Five, Archie Shepp, Elvin Jones, Sonny Rollins, and Jackie McLean). Growing up in a tough neighborhood, Indra spent her formative years in an imaginary world with her mother’s extensive record collection of jazz, soul, and rock music for company.

Singing was always a private experience for Indra, but at the age of 13, her mother convinced her to audition for a place at Mannes College of Music; despite her inhibitions about her singing Indra was awarded a scholarship. Indra developed her soprano voice and during the same year that she started studying at Mannes, she attended the Village Harmony, summer camp in Northern Vermont. Her teenage years were spent in a musical parallel existence; one full of classical arias and vocalization practice and the other filled with traditional American folks tunes and old Balkan folk songs in the woods of Vermont. 

While working as a waitress in a Brooklyn wine bar, she met Benjamin Traerup, a Danish jazz saxophonist; three weeks later they were living together and one year after that they were married and living in Denmark. According to Indra,

“If I hadn’t been young and a little stupid I would never have moved to Denmark, but I was in love, and I still am, so it was a pragmatic choice. It took me four years to learn Danish, as it is not a language that falls naturally from an American tongue. In the end we found that creativity was in part born out of hardship.”

Read Indra’s full bio on her website.

http://amzn.to/1H72suR

Use Facebook to Comment on this Post

Vote for Kendra’s Americulinariska.com blog in the 6th Annual @saveurmag Blog Awards

Topbar Vote for Kendras Americulinariska.com blog in the 6th Annual @saveurmag Blog Awards

Americulinariska.com is a Finalist for “Best Use of #Video” in the 6th Annual @saveurmag Blog Awards! We are one of six finalists (out of 50,000!) in the “Best Use of Video” category: and I need your vote! Click the link in the bio!

SAV 15 SBA LOGO final 0 Vote for Kendras Americulinariska.com blog in the 6th Annual @saveurmag Blog Awards

Vote for AmeriCulinariska

Now until April 30, 2015 voting will be open at saveur.com/blogawards NOTE: You have to sign up/login to vote. First hover over the AmeriCulinariska image, choose vote, and you’ll be asked to login or register. Simple process!

Use Facebook to Comment on this Post

Introducing the ‘Our Voices” series – From Denmark, Black Girl on Mars

Our voices Introducing the Our Voices series   From Denmark, Black Girl on Mars

I have been, if not a friend, a friendly acquaintance and fan of Lesley-Ann Brown, a.k.a. Black Girl on Mars since 2006 or so. Her writing is so compelling I am grateful she has agreed to let me share her work here in a new series of blog posts titled ‘Our Voices’*. Her first contribution in this series was originally published on The Murmur.

Right. Wrong. Right. Wrong. Right. Wrong.

Two knitting needles and a ball of yarn – that’s what I used to integrate into the Danish society. Sitting together but separately, I wove myself into the fabric of this culture, though it was my fingers that did all the work.

 Introducing the Our Voices series   From Denmark, Black Girl on Mars

No, I am not being indecisive.

Right. Wrong. Right. Wrong. Right. Wrong. That’s me learning how to knit as, hunched over two knitting needles, I struggle to “capture” the “free” yarn into the stitches already cast onto my needles.

Although the rest of the English speaking world learns to knit purl knit purl knit purl, my teacher Anni, is Danish. She teaches me to ‘ret og vrang’ instead, but all I hear is ‘right and wrong, right and wrong’.

After all, I don’t speak a word of Danish and her English isn’t fluent, but together we are moving into uncharted territory. While I patiently learn to knit, I start my timid journey of learning Danish. And through me, Anni gets to practice her English. It is no wonder that I could read Danish knitting patterns years before I could actually speak the language.

At the time, I am four months pregnant and a new arrival in Denmark. Anni is my mother in law, and I spend hours with her while my then-husband busily prepares for the arrival of our child. During this time together, Anni and I manage to cultivate our own authentic relationship, based on love – a relationship solidified through knitting.

There is perhaps no greater show of love than teaching someone to knit. It requires patience and presence – virtues held by my Danish mother-in-law. Although I am no longer married to her son, she will always hold a special place in my heart. Her teaching me to knit plays no small part in this.

It was through Anni that I was introduced to a tolerant Denmark. An open Denmark. Through Anni I met her Tante Liv, Anni’s fiercely independent aunt. We got along famously. She introduced me to the herbal flowers in her garden and taught me how to make natural teas. Once she leaned in and whispered, “There is something about a young woman moving 6000 miles away from her place of home.”

Tante Liv’s husband, Onkel Per, was a character. He took my pregnant South African friend and me to his boat club in northern Denmark. You could tell he got a kick from all the stares he received, an elderly Danish man with two young, pregnant and very foreign women. I still laugh when I think about that day, the way his big blue eyes twinkled as we sat in his boat, out at sea, and the other boats passed us by.

Tante Liv, as well as the rest of her family, treated me with nothing but love, respect and openness. It was a family of women who read and think. I was in my element. We were of the same tribe, brought together through the craft of knitting.

I had always wanted to learn how to knit. Whenever my grandmother from Trinidad visited us on Ocean Avenue in Brooklyn, smelling like peppermint and airplane, she would always have a few knitting and craft magazines with her.

They were full of knitwear masterpieces and patterns I had not yet learned to decipher. Despite being a renaissance woman of sorts, my grandmother did not know how to knit. She offered other lessons, including her deep, unwavering commitment to me. “You are here for a reason,” she’d whisper in my ear. Her words would soothe my unsettled soul like a cool Caribbean breeze.

My great grandmother Beryl Nunez died from “the draught,” a reference that could just as much allude to the cold as to racism, I suppose, in Canada. She made lace. My other great grandmother, Frances Lopez, also made exquisite handkerchiefs, delicate lace curtains and tablecloths. But despite my burning desire, there was no YouTube back then and no one to teach me. Don’t feel sorry for me; the 80s furnished me with plastic bubble jackets and roller skates. We played ‘run, catch, kiss’ and I mastered Double Dutch. I was happily distracted from myself.

Fast forward. I meet my Dane. We court. I meet his mother. It was love at first sight. My ex-husband and his mother ushered me into Danish culture with love and patience. And I know it was love, because she took the time to teach me to knit.

I have now gone on to teach three grade five classes how to knit and I stood back in wonder as I watched the children teach each other. I saw how boys want to learn how to knit as much as girls. I simmered with joy as the students worked together but separately, sitting quietly and knitting.

When I hold the yarn in my hand, I feel as though it connects me to my great-grandmothers. But it was Anni who brought out that creative energy. Knitting is magic, knitting is healing. Knitting is immeasurable. When you knit, your brain produces beta waves. No matter what troubles me, if I catch a whiff of wool, spy a ball of yarn, or hold a pair of knitting needles (bamboo preferably), I’m in bliss.

My time here has been sustained by the energy knitting has given me. When I returned from my last trip to the States in the autumn, I knew that I wanted to incorporate knitting more into my life. When I was in Rhode Island at the Rhode Island Writers Colony, I went to see the writer Anne Hood read from her latest book, “An Italian Wife”. She saw me in the audience with my knitting needles and yarn, stopped what she was saying and called out to ask me what I was knitting. A baby blanket for my friend’s newborn baby, I replied.

That’s what I love about knitting: it brings people together. So when I returned to Denmark, my intention was to start a knitting group.  I shyly put out a call of interest on Facebook and, to my delight, the Geeky Knitter’s Club was borne. Every week, a group of other expat women and myself gather to knit, talk, and offer support. It is one of the best ventures I have embarked on.

And the kids? Although I am no longer teaching, I still knit with them. All of this I owe to Anni Bomholtz – the most loving of ex-mother-in-laws.

Lesley-Ann Brown
 Introducing the Our Voices series   From Denmark, Black Girl on Mars

A Trinidadian American freelance writer living in Copenhagen, Lesley-Ann studied writing at The New School, NYC.
Read Lesley’s full bio. It’s fascinating!

*”Our Voices” aims to provide a platform for writers to share their work. The stories may have been published previously and are posted here due to their relevance to the black women’s experience in Europe.

Use Facebook to Comment on this Post

Margaret Gärding

Margaret Gärding and F!

Source: Wikipedia.org

MG for F Margaret Gärding and F!

Margaret Gärding

Feminist Initiative (Swedish: Feministiskt initiativ, abbreviated Fi or F!) is a feminist political party in Sweden. The party was formed (from a previous pressure group of the same name) in 2005, and announced on 9 September 2005 that it would put up candidates for the 2006 parliamentary elections in Sweden.

After running in the consequent two Riksdag elections, as well as the European Parliamentary election of 2009, Fi had not taken any seats in either parliament. The European elections of 2014 proved a turning point, as the party attracted 5.3% of the Swedish vote, with Soraya Post taking one seat in the European Parliament. This marks the first time an exclusively feminist political party won a seat in the European Parliament.

In the 2014 general election, Fi received a best-ever 3.1% of the vote; despite not meeting the 4.0% threshold for getting seats, Fi became the most popular party outside of parliament.

Margaret Gärding is the 1st stand in to go to the European Parliament when the F! party leader is unavailable. She leads Fi’s work concerning the European Union. She is part of the Nominating Committee for the party’s next elections.

Use Facebook to Comment on this Post

Thanks for the Food Cookbook

Award-winning food blogger and travel writer Whitney Love invites readers to get to know the Norway she loves through more than 70 delicious recipes. Thanks for the Food: The Culinary Adventures of An American in Norway transports readers to the kitchens of Norway with traditional and modern takes on:

  • Norway’s famous pepperkaker—Christmas cookies with a peppery snap;
  • Boller—heavenly cardamom-scented, sugar-laced cinnamon buns;
  • Norwegian meatballs with traditional brown gravy, potatoes, and lingonberry jam;
  • Crispy fish fritters, smoked salmon wraps, crab salad with dill, and other seafood dishes;
  • Fårikål, the national dish of lamb and cabbage—Norwegian soul food at its coziest;
  • And many more beloved sweets, salads, and hearty winter meals.

 Thanks for the Food Cookbook Thanks for the Food Cookbook
draws on the author’s experience as an American ex-pat, an adventure she shares on Thanks for the Food: A Norwegian Food Blog. In her new cookbook, Love offers tips on finding unusual ingredients (or substituting with excellent results), shares insights on Norway’s historic and modern food culture and culinary celebrations, and advises hungry travelers on getting the most from their own visits to Norway’s famous agricultural, fishing, and dairying regions. Get cooking with Thanks For The Food—and fall in love with Norway.

aDSC 5287 1024x1024 Thanks for the Food Cookbook

Written by Whitney Love

A1SjenjnNeL. SX80  Thanks for the Food Cookbook

Edited by Reilly O’Neal

Cover design and layout by Rositsa Germanova

Cover photo, recipe photos, and food styling by Linn Heidi Knutsen

Tableware provided by Figgjo Norway

Published by Digital Word Norway

pixel Thanks for the Food Cookbook

Use Facebook to Comment on this Post