BBC salutes Black Women during Black History Month

Black History Month in The United Kingdom

In the US some black joke that our Black History month is in February because it is the shortest month of the year. In Britain, Black History Month is celebrated in October which has 31 days.

And while the British Broadcasting Corporation affectionately known as the BBC didn’t shine a light on 31 fabulous Black Women this month they did highlight 12. And they wrote it for a young audience. In a time when many adult Brits deny the existence of racism in the UK, this history lesson is huge in my opinion. Here the chosen 12.

BBC Black History Month
Photo credit: Various

Source: BBC

Black History Month has been marked in the UK for more than 30 years. It takes place during the month of October.

It is held to highlight and celebrate the achievements and contributions of the black community in the UK.

Throughout history, black people have made huge contributions to society in the fields of art, music, science, literature and many more areas.

But in the past, these contributions have often been ignored or played down because black people weren’t treated the same way as other people because of the colour of their skin.

BBC Black History Month
GETTY IMAGES This picture from the 1960s shows people protesting for equal rights

Black History Month aims to address this unfairness by celebrating these achievements and contributions.

Read on to find out about the incredible things that 12 women, in particular, have done for Britain.

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Phillis Wheatley (1753-1784)

BBC Black History Month
Image BLACKHISTORYMONTH.ORG.UK

Phillis Wheatley was born in West Africa.

When she was a young girl, she was put on board a ship and sent to the US, where she was sold as a slave to a family called the Wheatleys. She was named after that ship – the Phillis.

While Phillis was a slave, she was taught to read and write, which was unusual at the time.

She wrote her first poem at the age of 14. At the age of 20, she moved to England with her son and within a year, published her first book.

This made her the first African-American poet to be published, with her first volume of poetry in 1773.

The fact that her writing was so brilliant proved that women who were slaves could have amazing intellectual ideas, when people hadn’t thought that they could, and this contributed towards the anti-slavery movement.

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Mary Seacole (1805-1881)

BBC Black History Month
IMAGE National Geographical Society

Mary Seacole was born and grew up in Jamaica, but came over to England in 1854.

She asked the War Office if she could go to help wounded soldiers who were fighting in the Crimean War (1853-1856), but she wasn’t allowed.

So she raised the money herself and travelled to Balaclava, Ukraine. Here, she looked after British soldiers who had been injured.

Despite all that she did, not many people knew who she was or the amazing work that she had done after she died. Most people remember Florence Nightingale, who helped many people too.

However, people have campaigned to make sure that people remember everything that Mary Seacole did.

In 2016, a statue of her was built outside St Thomas’ Hospital in London. Ayshah went to find out more about it ahead of it being built.

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Fanny Eaton (1835-unknown)

BBC Black History Month
Image BRIDGEMAN IMAGES

You can see Fanny Eaton featured in a lot of artwork by Pre-Raphaelite artists (a period of art which started in the mid-1880s).

That’s because she worked as a model for several well-known artists.

She moved to London from Jamaica and worked at the Royal Academy. The Royal Academy is an extremely famous place in London for art – especially painting, sculpture and architecture – which started in 1768.

One of the artists that she modelled for called Dante Gabriel Rossetti praised how beautiful Fanny was. This was significant because, at the time, many people did not see black people as beautiful, so black women were not featured very much in Western art.

But Fanny Eaton challenged this and is an important figure in the history of art.

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Evelyn Dove (1902-1987)

BBC Black History Month
Image BBC

Evelyn was the daughter of a lawyer from Sierra Leone in Africa and his English wife.

She was a student at the Royal Academy of Music, which is a bit like the Royal Academy where Fanny Eaton modelled, but for music.

While she was there, she performed with some of the world’s top black entertainers and went on to become a singing and acting star of the 1920s.

She became famous all over the world, at a time when black female performers would struggle to get the same recognition as white entertainers because of racial prejudices.

 

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Lilian Bader (1918-2015)

BBC Black History Month
Image IMPERIAL WAR MUSEUM VIA BLACKHISTORYMONTH.ORG.UK

Lilian Bader was born in 1918 in Liverpool and went on to become one of the very first black women to join the British Armed Forces.

Starting out as a canteen assistant at an army base in Yorkshire, she eventually trained as an instrument repairer, before becoming a leading aircraftwoman and soon afterwards earning herself the rank of Corporal.

Three generations of her family served in the armed forces.

When she left the army to have children of her own, she retrained and got a degree from the University of London to become a teacher.

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Joan Armatrading (1950-today)

BBC Black History Month
Image BBC

Back to music and Joan Armatrading is a name that if you are into blues you may already know.

This is because she was the first ever female UK artist to be nominated for a Grammy in the blues category. She went on to be nominated three times.

She arrived in the UK at the age of seven, from the Caribbean island of Saint Kitts. She started writing songs at the age of 14. She also taught herself to play the guitar.

In the 1970s, she became the first black British singer songwriter to enjoy great success abroad.

Then, in 2007, she became the first female UK artist to debut at number 1 in the Billboards blues chart (which is like the top 40 chart for blues music in America).

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Olive Morris (1952-1979)

BBC Black History Month
IMAGE Nyansapo – The Pan African Drum

Olive Morris was an important figure in terms of civil rights.

Black people didn’t used to have the same rights as other people, simply because of the colour of their skin – and Olive was one of many people who worked tirelessly to change that.

She campaigned for the rights of black people in South London and Manchester and was a founding member of groups like the Organisation of Women of African and Asian Descent (OWAAD) and the Brixton Black Women’s Group.

She passed away at the age of just 27, but even by this age she had contributed an enormous amount to black communities across the country.

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Margaret Busby (1944-today)

BBC Black History Month
Image GETTY IMAGES

Margaret is an extremely influential name in the world of publishing.

That’s because she was Britain’s youngest and first black female book publisher, when she co-founded the publishing company Allison & Busby in 1967, alongside a man called Clive Allison.

The company didn’t only publish work by black writers, but it did help to make the names of many black writers more well-known.

Talking about writing today, Margaret says: “Technology permits you to be your own publisher and editor, which should encourage a lot of us – especially young people – to write and express themselves.”

“Write because you really enjoy it and learn to be a good reader because the best writers read voraciously. Get to know the best books out there.”

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Diane Abbott (1953-today)

BBC Black History Month
Image GETTY IMAGES

In 1987, Diane Abbott made history by becoming the first black woman ever to be elected to Parliament.

Her career in politics began in 1982, when she was elected to Westminster City Council, before being voted into the House of Commons five years later.

It made her part of the first group of black and Asian people to sit in Parliament for almost a century – but back then, only men got the jobs.

She also started the London Schools and the Black Child programme, which aims to help black children to do well in school.

She still serves in Parliament to this day as one of the main politicians in the Labour party.

Editor’s note: Dianne Abbott is on our 2010 Power List.

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Malorie Blackman (1962-today)

BBC Black History Month
Image GETTY IMAGES

Another author that you may well have heard of is the best-selling author of the Noughts & Crosses series – Malorie Blackman.

When she was chosen to become the eighth Children’s Laureate, she became the first black person to take on the role.

She got the job in 2013, before passing on the baton to British illustrator and writer Chris Riddell in 2015.

Malorie says she wanted to “make reading irresistible” for children, by encouraging them to explore a range of literature, from short stories to graphic novels.

Editor’s note: Malorie Blackman in on our 2011 Power List.

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Dr. Shirley Thompson

BBC Black History Month
Image WINSTON SILL

Only recently, Dr. Shirley Thomson was named as “one of the most inspirational Black British women” by the newspaper Metro.

In 2004, she became the first woman in Europe to conduct and compose a symphony within the last 40 years. It was called New Nation Rising, A 21st Century Symphony.

The piece of music celebrated London’s history and was composed to mark the Queen’s Golden Jubilee in 2002.

She has also written pieces to be used in films, on television, by dancers and on stage.

Because of her work, she was named on the Evening Standard’s Power List of Britain’s Top 100 Most Influential Black People in 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015 and 2016.

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Zadie Smith (1975-today)

BBC Black History Month
Image GETTY IMAGES

If you go into a book shop, you would be very likely to spot one of Zadie Smith’s books on the shelves.

She is an extremely successful author, having published her first book at the age of just 24.

Her books, which are inspired by her experience of issues around race and what society is like, have received many prizes.

She has also written essays and short stories, and now teaches at New York University.

Editor’s note: Zadie Smith is on our 2010 Power List.

7th Annual Summer School on BLACK EUROPE

Thank you for the reminder Angela Shaw. Every year I say I am going to take this course one summer. I have to ensure that it comes to pass.

Black Europe

7th Annual Summer School on Black Europe
Interrogating Citizenship, Race and Ethnic Relations

Amsterdam, Netherlands – June 23 – July 4, 2014

The Summer School on Black Europe is an intensive two week course offered in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. The 7th annual Summer School on Black Europe will take place from June 23rd to July 4th, 2014 in Amsterdam (The Netherlands) in collaboration with The Center of Study and Investigation for Global Dialogues (Barcelona, Spain).*

The Summer School on Black Europe will be held at:

International Institute for Research and Education (IIRE)
Lombokstraat 40, 1094 AL Amsterdam, The Netherlands

APPLY HERE

The overall goal of this course is to examine the contemporary circumstances of the African Diaspora (and “other” immigrants of color) in Europe. We will focus on and discuss the origins of Black Europe and investigate the impact of these legacies on policies, social organizations and legislation today. This course will begin with a historical overview of the African Diaspora in Europe that traces the involvement of European nations in the colonization of the Americas. We will address the migration and settlement of Blacks in Europe, and examine immigration and citizenship laws that regulated their settlement. We will also look at anti-discrimination laws as they have arisen in various European countries. We compare the history of regulation and management of race and ethnic relations and the discourse surrounding the concept of Blackness and self-identification. Historically, social forces and social movements within Europe have given rise to policies to combat racism. We will trace the chain of events following social and civil conflicts that prompted these policies and analyze the legislative and intellectual discourse produced in the aftermath. In addition, we will explore notions of Blackness as official categorization; as a social construction employed by the dominant groups to indicate (non) belonging; as a Diaspora living within Europe; and as a contestation of the dominant (White) paradigm. In this way, we examine the social mobilization of Blacks to resist domination.

The above issues will be considered in light of the immediacy of contemporary global and European forces, including competing issues and discourses on Islamophobia, increased non-Black migration into and across Europe, and the debt crisis in the European Union.

This course will also seek to address the dimensions of race and ethnic relations that are unique to Europe; examining the ways in which conceptions of the “other” are institutionalized and reproduced; the rise of xenophobia in various EU countries; issues such as global racisms, everyday racism and epistemic racism; the legal definitions and discourse surrounding the conceptualized “other”; and examining the ways in which each country has dealt with issues of race and national identity. To this effect guest speakers for the 2013 program will be drawn from Germany, Italy and Portugal for case studies in those countries.

Affiliated Faculty Members include:

  • DR. MARTA ARAUJO, UNIVERSITY OF COIMBRA (PORTUGAL)
  • DR. PHILOMENA ESSED, ANTIOCH UNIVERSITY
  • DR. JEANETTE DAVIDSON, UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA
  • DR. DAVID THEO GOLDBERG, UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA HUMANITIES RESEARCH INSTITUTE
  • DR. RAMON GROSFOGUEL, UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY
  • DR. DIENKE HONDIUS, VRIJE UNIVERSITEIT AMSTERDAM
  • DR. KWAME NIMAKO, UNIVERSITEIT VAN AMSTERDAM
  • DR. STEPHEN SMALL, UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY
  • DR. MELISSA F. WEINER, COLLEGE OF THE HOLY CROSS
  • DR. GLORIA WEKKER, UNIVERSITEIT VAN UTRECHT
  • DONNA DRIVER-ZWARTKRUIS, VRIJE UNIVERSITEIT

(More Faculty Info)

 

Tuition

The tuition for this course is € 1600 (or € 1300 without housing) .

Tuition includes housing, the opening reception, lunches on all class days, weekly get-togethers with faculty, a course reader, a public transportation pass, and travel costs and entrance to museums and exhibitions during excursions (excluding an optional excursion to Paris).

The Paris excursion includes participation in a workshop on Migration and Social Movements at the Maison des Sciences de l’Homme (MSH) in Paris.

Tuition does not include travel to and from Amsterdam.

For more information over the Summer School, please email:
blackeurope [at] dialogoglobal.com

K. Nimako, Director
Email: obee [at] telfort.nl

Mano Delea, Project Manager
Email: mano.delea [at] gmail.com

Camilla Hawthorne, Coordinator North America
Email: camilla.hawthorne [at] Berkeley.edu

Giovanni Picker, Coordinator East/Central Europe & Russia
Email: giovanni.picker [at] gmail.com

APPLICATION

About the Center

Logo Dialogo Global

DIÀLEG GLOBAL –

DIÀLEG GLOBAL (Center of Study and Investigation for Global Dialogues) is a non-profit and non-governmental organization promoting research, knowledge-making, education (through seminars, workshops, exhibits, round-tables discussions, publications and video-making) and public policy to invent and work towards non-competitive horizons of life, of socio-economic organization and international relations. Non-profit and non-governmental organizations emerge from within civil and political society to address issues that are not supported or attended to by government and corporations. Their function is crucial in building futures that are beyond the regulations of States or the needs of the Corporations. In order for civil and political society to become relevant actors in social transformation and pointing out the limits of corporate values and state regulation, it is necessary to create institutions of knowledge-making not at the service of the state or corporations, but to the benefit of the civil society.

For further inquiries and information, please send e-mail to blackeurope [at] dialogoglobal.com.
Find us also on Facebook!

During the Summer School, we will also be hosting the International Symposium on Black Europe 2014. The 2013 Symposium on Black Europe was titled, Inside Black Europe: Racial Configurations in the Post 9/11 Era (in Europe). Click here for information on the 2012 Symposium.

 

* Previous sessions of the Summer School on Black Europe were organized in Amsterdam, in collaboration with the University of Amsterdam, the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam and NiNsee, the National Institute for the study of Dutch Slavery and its Legacy.

Nice things happen to me in Sweden – Celebrating birthdays

I’m so glad my girlfriend invited me to celebrate her birthday with her in Halmstad.

Pre-party
Pre-party.

The two of us started with a little bubbly and appetizers at her place.

Dinner for 7.
Dinner for 7.

We had a delicious dinner Fridolfs Krog

Having fun at the Boom Boom Room!
Having fun at the Boom Boom Room!

I hadn’t been out dancing in ages and the Boom Boom Room was the perfect place to have fun.

I had SO MUCH FUN! Nice things happen to me in Sweden.

Black Women Bloggers in Europe Series – Scotland 2 – Wife. Bride. Life.

In a nutshell, I’m a Canadian expat living in Scotland by way of Japan. This blog is about my experiences living abroad and my life as a woman and a wife. For a time, I anticipated writing about being a mother, but sadly that dream ended on 17th May 2010 when I went into premature labour and delivered a daughter, Isla. This is about what happens next.

Read Wife. Bride. Life.

Black Women Bloggers in Europe Series – Scotland – Adventures in Negroshire


Peggy lives in Scotland which is a long way from Haiti from whence she hails. She’s a PhD candidate and mother and still finds time to write the Adventures in Negroshire blog.

Previous entries in the series:
Denmark
England
Switzerland
Slovenija
France
Germany
Italy
England 2
Norway
Czech Republic
France 2
Norway 2
The Netherlands
Sweden
The Netherlands 2
France 3
Germany 2