Race and Resistance across Borders in the Long Twentieth Century – May 8 event in Oxford

 Race and Resistance across Borders in the Long Twentieth Century   May 8 event in Oxford

Launched in January 2013, the Race and Resistance network brings together researchers in the history, literature, and culture of anti-racist movements in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Europe, Latin America, the United States, and beyond.

We meet every Friday during term-time, with sessions taking a variety of formats, including lectures by invited speakers, short research presentations, seminars discussing pre-circulated texts from a range of disciplines, book launches, and film screenings.

All are welcome to attend.

The interdisciplinary research group ‘Race and Resistance across Borders in the Long Twentieth Century’ brings together researchers in the history, literature and culture of anti-racist movements in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Europe, Latin America, the United States, and beyond.

Events will take place in the TORCH Seminar Room, 3rd Floor of the Radcliffe Humanities Building, Oxford University (unless otherwise stated), and lunch will be provided at the lunchtime meetings.

8th May, 12.30 – 2.30pm: (**please note change of time and place)

Film screening of When Voices Rise, followed by discussion with civil rights activist, Dr Kingsley Tweed.

Eccles Room, Pembroke College

When Voices Rise is a 2002 documentary focusing on the civil rights movement in Bermuda and the struggle to end segregation in the 1950s. The film was directed by Errol Williams and features an interview with Dr Kingsley Tweed, founder of Bermuda’s Black Brotherhood.

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Race and Resistance across Borders in the Long Twentieth Century – May 1 event in Oxford

 Race and Resistance across Borders in the Long Twentieth Century   May 1 event in Oxford

Launched in January 2013, the Race and Resistance network brings together researchers in the history, literature, and culture of anti-racist movements in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Europe, Latin America, the United States, and beyond.

We meet every Friday during term-time, with sessions taking a variety of formats, including lectures by invited speakers, short research presentations, seminars discussing pre-circulated texts from a range of disciplines, book launches, and film screenings.

All are welcome to attend.

The interdisciplinary research group ‘Race and Resistance across Borders in the Long Twentieth Century’ brings together researchers in the history, literature and culture of anti-racist movements in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Europe, Latin America, the United States, and beyond.

Events will take place in the TORCH Seminar Room, 3rd Floor of the Radcliffe Humanities Building, Oxford University (unless otherwise stated), and lunch will be provided at the lunchtime meetings.

Week 1:    1st May  (12.45  – 2pm):

A discussion, led by members of CRAE (Campaign for Racial Awareness and Equality), exploring the lessons in curriculum reform that can be learnt from other institutions.

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Space scientist Dr Maggie Aderin-Pocock

Source: The Guardian

After graduating with a BSc in physics, and later a PhD in mechanical engineering, from Imperial College London, she worked for the Ministry of Defence on projects ranging from missile warning systems to landmine detectors, before returning to her first love: building instruments to explore the wonders of space.

The telescope is just mind boggling,

she says of the Gemini instruments, her voice abuzz with her trademark fervour.

I like to call it a cathedral to science because sometimes I go out to Guildford Cathedral and [it has] this big vaulted ceiling. It is large and echoey, and the telescope is just the same.

Read the full interview on The Guardian.

Source: BBC

 Space scientist Dr Maggie Aderin Pocock

As a dyslexic child, Maggie found reading and writing in school difficult. Nonetheless, it was a book that changed her life. On its cover was an astronaut. As soon as Maggie saw that picture of a man floating without gravity in his amazing suit, she craved more information about space. Driven by a desire to understand how the universe worked, she studied science and went on to make new discoveries about space on her own. Maggie worked hard to overcome stereotypes by staying true to her goal. Despite not fitting the common image of a ‘serious, white male scientist’, she made it. Her message to others is simple:

Believe in yourself, and you can achieve so much.

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Black Mental Health UK at 16th session of the United Nations Working Group of Experts on People of African Descent Geneva

Matilda MacAttram UNWGPAD Sesstion 2015 445x335 2 Black Mental Health UK at 16th session of the United Nations Working Group of Experts on People of African Descent Geneva
Human rights campaigns group Black Mental Health UK (BMHUK) attended 16th session of the United Nations Working Group of Experts on People of African Descent (WGEPAD in Geneva last week as the work of implementing the International Decade of People of African Descent gets underway.

This annual week-long session held at the Palais De Nations in Geneva, Switzerland is convened for the Working Group of Experts to agree on the implementation on the Decade of People of African Descent and hear from  nation states, invited speakers  and civil society organisations that advocate for  or serve people of African Descent across the Diaspora.

Now that the UN Decade of People of African Descent has been announced BMH UK’s attendance at this year’s session is part of the campaigns groups work to ensure that this issue as it relates to the Diaspora in the UK is put on the programme of action  for this UN Decade so that some of the most disturbing human rights abuses faced by black people in need of mental health care living in the UK are addressed.

BMH UK presented a 10 page briefing to this working group on the human rights concerns that they have over the way black people living in the UK are treated by mental health services and the police when they are in need of mental health care.

During the week long session BMH UK’s director Matilda MacAttram raised the issue of the mass incarceration of people in the Diaspora in the criminal justice system, and also the issue of policing and it relates to black Britons from the floor of this form.

Connections were also made with many other civil society leaders and agengies around the world also fighting for justice for people of African Descent around the world.
Matilda MacAttram, director of BMH UK and Fellow of the UNWGPAD said: ‘There are very few arenas whether domestically or internationally where the issues that BMH UK have been campaigning on for a number of years now are prioritised. We have found the international human rights community at the United Nations here in Geneva very supportive of our work and now we want to turn this into more tangible action that will make a real difference  for the people that BMH UK have been set up to serve back home in the UK.

One of the reasons for attending this year’s session is that BMH UK are of the view that we cannot continue to see people from this community treated so badly by services that are supposed to help them  just because of the colour of their skin. It is not right that people from our community on psychiatric wards fear being restrained just because they are in distressed or over- medicated rather than offered talking therapies or counselling services that they need.

It is shocking to know that black people are locked up on overcrowded dirty wards fearful that staff will call the police in riot gear in a  hospital with taser, batons and CS spray if they decide a patient in distress is proving to be too much of a handful.

People are truly fearful of what might happen to them and this should not be so. BMH UK are here in at the United Nations so that the protections afforded to this group only on paper right now becomes a reality as is their human right.’

Delegates at this year’s session included Malaak Shabazz, daughter of civil rights leader Malcom X, the High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein, Pastor Elias Murillo Marinez, member of the UN committee on the Convention on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD), UN working group expert Professor Verene Shepherd and current chair of the working group, Mirelle Fanon Mendes France.

Recommendations from this 16th session included establishing a Forum for people of African descent as a platform where individual nation states, civil society and the UN will strategise and plan concrete actions for the Decade.

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Barbados born Marvo Straughn from Lewisham tells us how she came up with the idea of her business of Caribbean Baby Foods.

How we started

I had a dream I was in a supermarket with my baby son Andrew who was in his buggy and he wanted me to buy some cornmeal porridge, (which is a traditional dish in the Caribbean). I looked at the shelves in the baby isle, but could not see any, then I woke up, and suddenly the idea came to me. I then told my other 2 children Roxanne and Toni that I will go to some shops to check out the varieties of baby foods, and was surprised to find there were were no Caribbean recipes available. Now my dream has become a reality.

After realising there was a demand for Caribbean baby food and no one producing it. Marvo experimented with some recipes trying them out on family and friends. She started selling them in Lewisham market where she found a great demand for the Caribbean recipes. Since then Marvo has approached local retailers, schools, nurseries and hospitals and has had a great response.

Background

 Barbados born Marvo Straughn from Lewisham tells us how she came up with the idea of her business of Caribbean Baby Foods.

Marvo Straughn and Prince Charles.

Marvo’s frozen baby foods are for babies from the age of 4 months plus, (stage 1). The recipes are formulated using the finest natural ingredients, ready for baby to eat. The products have a 12 month shelf life, and there are 5 delicious recipes available. The foods are lovingly handmade and once made, the foods are blast frozen, to seal in the goodness and flavours.

Marvo Foods contain no additives or preservatives. Currently 5 recipes are available:

Apple and Mango

Green Banana and Pumpkin

Sweet Potato and Carrot

Cornmeal Porridge

Cod and Plantain

pixel Barbados born Marvo Straughn from Lewisham tells us how she came up with the idea of her business of Caribbean Baby Foods.

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