Sabina Ddumba – Swedish singer known for Gospel and Soul

Sabina Ddumba

Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Sabina Ddumba
Sabina Ddumba in 2015.jpg

Ddumba at Allsång på Skansen in 2015

Sabina Ddumba, (born 23 February 1994) is a Swedish singer. Ddumba grew up in Fisksätra, Nacka. Her music has soul, gospel, and R&B influences. Ddumba was a backing vocalist on Katy Perry’s song “Walking on Air” and has collaborated with artists such as the hip-hop band Looptroop Rockers, duo Lorentz & Sakarias and Adam Kanyama. She is signed to Warner Music. Ddumba released her first single, “Scarred for Life”, in 2014, and her second single, “Effortless” in 2015. Both were certified platinum. Ddumba appeared in Moraeus med mera in 2014 and performed at Grammisgalan in 2015. She performed at the 2015 Swedish Grammys, and recently won ‘Newcomer of the Year’ at the 2016 P3 Gold Awards.

Early life

Sabina Ddumba was born on 23 February 1994 in Fisksätra, Nacka. She is the sixth out of eight children. Her mother is Ugandan, and when she was eight years old, her mother moved back to Uganda. After listening to traditional Ugandan nursery rhymes and songs, she became interested in melody and phrasing. She has been writing songs on and off since the age of 10. At the age of fourteen, she joined the Tensta Gospel Choir and sang with the group for about six years. It was through this choir that she found singing was her vocation. Her father and relatives, however, wanted her to pursue a more scholarly profession, such as a doctor.

Musical Influences

Ddumba was inspired by the Ugandan nursery rhymes and songs she heard as a child. She also grew up listening to the hip-hop and R&B of the late 1990s. As her family was religious, the gospel music she heard in church on Sundays has also greatly influenced her musical style. Her time with the Tensta Gospel Choir strengthened the influence that gospel music has had on her work.

Career

Ddumba participated in The X Factor Sverige in 2012. Also in 2012, she sang on Adam Kanyama’s track, “The Golden Child” and collaborated with the duo Lorentz & Sakarias. In 2013 she sang background vocals for Katy Perry’s single “Walking On Air”, which was featured on Perry’s album, Prism. The same year she collaborated with hip-hop group Looptroop Rockers on their song “Sea of Death”. In 2014 she released her first single, “Scarred for Life”. After the release of this single, in 2015 she signed with Warner Music. In 2015, Ddumba released her second single, “Effortless”, which was certified platinum in Sweden. The song was co-written with Carmen Reece, and produced by Nick Ruth and T-Collar. Her latest single, “Not Too Young” was 30 October 2015. This single was certified double platinum. In February 2015, Ddumba performed at the Swedish Grammys. In 2016, she performed “Not Too Young” at the P3 Gold Awards, winning the award for Newcomer of the Year. Ddumba will be releasing a follow-up single to “Not Too Young” titled “Not Too Young Pt. II”, which will be produced by Wolf Cousins.

Donna Kinnair, Director of Nursing, Policy and Practice, Royal College of Nirsing

Donna Kinnair, Director of Nursing, Policy and Practice

Dame Donna Kinnair
Dame Professor Donna Kinnair, joined the RCN as head of Nursing in 2015, providing leadership to the Nursing departments. Donna was then promoted and joined the RCN Executive Team to Director of Nursing, Policy and Practice in 2016, where her key role is to work with UK-wide RCN staff to drive and implement the future RCN professional nursing, policy and practice strategy.

Prior to joining the RCN Donna held various roles, including Clinical Director of Emergency Medicine at Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals Trust; Executive Director of Nursing, Southeast London Cluster Board; Director of Commissioning, London Borough of Southwark & Southwark PCT. She was the Strategic Commissioner for Lambeth, Southwark and Lewisham Health Authority’s Children’s Services.

Donna advised the PM’s Commission on the future of Nursing and Midwifery in 2010 and served as nurse/child health assessor to the Victoria Climbié Inquiry.

She was quoted in a BBC article last year, NHS staffing levels lagging behind workload.

Dame Donna Kinnair, of the Royal College of Nursing, said the “meagre” increase in vital nursing staff was hard to understand and argued that it reflected recruitment failures in earlier years.

“The government must commit to train and retain more nurses to ensure patients receive the care they deserve.”

Our Reading List

The Black Women in Europe™ Reading List is a work in progress.

If you are a sister in Europe and have published a book that has not been included please let me know by sending the information to contact@blackwomenineurope.com or by leaving that information in the comments below.

Some of the titles on our list have been written by men, but they speak to our collective experience. Happy reading.

To Exist is to Resist – Call for Submissions

To Exist is to Resist: Black Feminism in Europe

black feminism

This edited collection will explore how women of colour:

  • Theorize Black feminism and womanism from European perspectives
  • Build and sustain activist spaces for survival and resistance
  • Challenge, subvert and transform socialist, feminist, populist and/or anarchist politics
  • Develop transnational alliances and intersectional and intergenerational coalitions for equality and social justice
  • Engage with creative practice as a means of activism and self-preservation

We have an agreement in principle from Pluto Press to publish this edited collection.

Deadlines

We seek 3,000-5,000 word chapters (including bibliography) in English from activists, practitioners, artists, students, and scholars by Monday, 18th September 2017.

If you’re interested in contributing a chapter, please contact Akwugo Emejulu.


 

Nigger in the woodpile. Say what?

Source: Black Women in Europe™ Social Media Group

A Conservative MP has been suspended from the party after it emerged she used a racist expression during a public discussion about Brexit.

nigger
Ms Morris has been MP for Newton Abbot since 2010

According to the British Broadcasting Corporation  Anne Marie Morris, the MP for Newton Abbot, used the phrase at an event in London to describe the prospect of the UK leaving the EU without a deal.

Don’t believe me? Click on the image below to listen to her say it courtesy of the Huffington Post UK:
nigger

Why in the world would Morris say,

Now we get to the real nigger in the woodpile

when suggesting that just 7% of financial services would be affected by Brexit is beyond me. And apparently beyond the grasp of PM May who acted swiftly saying,

“I immediately asked the chief whip to suspend the party whip,” she said in a statement. “Language like this has absolutely no place in politics or in today’s society.”  (source : BBC) That’s a no-brainer but was a necessary statement and move.

And it didn’t stop there.

Leader Tim Farron said he was “shocked” and called for her to be suspended from the parliamentary party. “This disgusting comment belongs in the era of the Jim Crow laws and has no place in our Parliament,” he said. (source: BBC)

Now why is this a big deal?  The BBC breaks it down like this:

The phrase originated in the American Deep South in the mid-19th Century and is thought to have referred to slaves having to conceal themselves as they sought to flee north and secure their freedom.

It was subsequently used in the 20th Century – including by a number of leading novelists – as a metaphor to describe a hidden fact or problem.

This is another example why The Black Women in Europe™ Social Media Group non-profit is vital. We face attacks like this daily whether others see or hear them or not. It is not in our heads. It is a reality.

You can support us by making a donation and by submitting the names to contact@bwiesmg.org of organizations across Europe that support black women as we build the most comprehensive directory of its kind.


 

MoMineral MakeUp

MoMineral MakeUp

Mineral Makeup for Dark Skin. Made in UK

MoMineral

Source: Woman.ng

After 8 years of working as a freelance makeup artist, Omolara Tayo-Sobajo has seen the shortcomings of many major makeup brands on the high street.

As a passionate advocate for ‘many shades of beauty’, Omolara feels that mainstream makeup brands are still not formulated with women of colour in mind despite countless campaigns from Women of Colour to change this. It was with this knowledge and her passion for makeup that led her to launch the MoMineral MakeUp line.

Only a few makeup brands produced limited shades of foundation for dark skin and the available brands will either leave the skin looking too grey or too “ashy” and dry.  In addition to this, the composition of some makeup products available on the market are not always healthy for melanin-rich skin.

MoMineral
Omolara Tayo-Sobajo holds a degree in Microbiology and an MBA.

MoMineral Makeup was created to provide African and Caribbean women with more choice when it comes to makeup products and our products are formulated from natural ingredients.” – Omolara Tayo Sobajo.

MoMineral Makeup is highly aware of the complex diversity of overtones and undertones caused by the rich melanin pigment in dark skins resulting in many shade variations. The company prides itself on giving women of colour more makeup choices, particularly women with darker skin tones.

MoMineral

MoMineral products are formulated and manufactured in the United Kingdom, regulated and certified by the highest cosmetics standard in order to provide the dark skin with makeup products with skin healthy benefits.

Shop online.


 

Black women in England are twice as likely to be diagnosed with advanced breast cancer as white women.

breast cancer

Source: The Guardian

Black women in England are more likely to get advanced breast cancer than white women, new analysis by Cancer Research UK and Public Health England shows.

It was concluded that late-stage disease affected almost twice as many black women (22% of black African women and 22% of black Caribbean women) than white women (13%).

Experts say this is for many reasons, including possible differences in tumour biology, low awareness of symptoms and screening and barriers to seeking help.

While spotting the disease early is key, Heather Nelson of BME Cancer Voice, said in an interview with the BBC: “Women of colour are less likely to go for screening”.

“You’ll get leaflets through your door and they will be predominantly of white, middle-class women. There’s no representation of South Asian, African descent et cetera”.

“If you get information like that, you’re going to look and think, ‘That’s not about me.’”

One woman said to the BBC:

“A lot of us black people bury our head in the sand: ‘Oh, me, well, I don’t need to go, there’s nothing wrong with me.’”

But lots of work has taken place around breast cancer prevention. In October, the international community celebrated Breast Cancer Awareness Month. The pink ribbon has become a symbol to express moral support for women with the disease.

So, why is this work not reaching everyone? If you’re a black survivor of breast cancer, we want to hear your thoughts. When did you find out you had cancer and what has your experience been? What do you think of the prevention messages available? Does it talk to a diverse range of communities? Why do you think that black women are less likely to go for screening?

Share your story.