Questionnaire: Highly skilled women’s migration from Sub-Saharan countries to EU Countries

Find the survey in English, French and Italian from this link:
http://camillas.limequery.com/index.php/933529/lang-en

The survey is conducted in the framework of the research “Highly skilled women migration from SSA to Europe. Beyond the economic point of view” that intend to analyze the highly skilled women migrations flows from Sub – Saharan Africa to Europe in order to explore the present scenario as well as the migration strategies and the social remittances connected to these flows.

The questionnaire will take to you at max 10 minutes and your participation is important for the success of the survey.

As I anticipated the research counts of 2 moments of interview: one is the questionnaire and the other is a short semi structured online interview. It is not necessary to participate to both moment of the research, but it will be important to me your participation also to the semi structured interview.
As you can imagine more respondents we have and better it is, so if you know other women that belongs form one Sub-Saharan Country and live in one EU Country and are highly skilled (at least bachelor degree) please feel free to share the link to them.

I would like to inform you that the questionnaire is anonymous.

If you are interested to take part also to the semi structured interview and for any further questions please contact me through:
Email: camilla.spadavecchia@gmail.com
Linkedin: Camilla Spadavecchia
Skype: Camilla Unige

Best regards

Camilla Spadavecchia

PhD Candidate
Universitá degli Studi di Genova
c.so Andrea Podestá 2
16121
Genova
Italy

How to give and get with meaning and savvy.

I love giving and receiving gifts. I like to give the gift that is so well suited, totally defines their personality, brings true joy, the recipient can’t believe I actually nailed it!

Ebates How to give and get with meaning and savvy.

But I also need to be smart with money. Who doesn’t? I discovered eBates in 2006 and haven’t looked back. When you shop online using eBates you get a cash rebate. No joke.

Stores How to give and get with meaning and savvy.

And the stores offering rebates are actually stores where you want to buy. You trust them, you know they will deliver and provide quality items.

button 300x178 How to give and get with meaning and savvy.

“Well who is going to remember to go to eBates before shopping online”, you grumble. Well I tell you, you don’t have to. Install the web browser button and you will be notified if your shopping qualifies for a rebate. Magic.

ipad 292x300 How to give and get with meaning and savvy.

“I want to shop using my iPad or iPhone”, you say. Well you can. So no excuses for not getting cash back when you shop for others and dare I say, shop for yourself.

gg1 300x43 How to give and get with meaning and savvy.

You know how good it feels to give a gift. Did you know you can give a gift that benefits someone else who needs you help?

gg2 How to give and get with meaning and savvy.

I love to give the gifts that give more: affordably priced donations in the name of your loved one. Who needs more clutter? Give a gift that truly matters.

gg3 How to give and get with meaning and savvy.

But if you are going to buy clothing, jewelry or household items, you can buy fair trade AND donate food at the same time. Win, win! Visit Greater Good for a huge selection of gifts or items for yourself or opportunities to give that will leave you feeling good. The person you gifted will feel good too!

This is how I give and get with meaning and savvy.

Book launch event in Oxford – TORCH Race and Resistance Research Network

book launch invite Book launch event in Oxford   TORCH Race and Resistance Research Network

Visit the TORCH website.

Twaambo Kapilikisha – In the middle.

In a new series of articles, black women living in Europe share their views from the inside. In our fourth article, Twaambo Kapilikisha addresses sisters in Europe with children “in the middle”. 

Twitter is an interesting place,where mere mortals can connect with celebrities and get a message to them directly, a place where the masses gather for different causes,good and bad ones.

I was a witness to some recent twitter backlash towards a singer who tweeted another singer about the fact that they were both half African (They each had one parent from a certain African country)

That was not taken too well with some of the citizens of said country.

They sent her lots of mean tweets, going on about her not being able to properly pronounce her last name, tweeting things like ‘Oh you’re one of us now are you?’

The artist was indeed shocked and could not believe how mean people were being!

I remember when this artist was hot on the charts, she did acknowledge her African side, but seemed not to identify too much with it and could not.

This got me thinking about how we are raising our children far away from where we were born.

There is a large number of women, living in countries where they were not born, married to men of a different citizenship, culture and sometimes colour.

These amazing women have uprooted themselves,l eft the familiar and set up homes away from the home that they knew.

They have accomplished things their mothers only dreamed about, have access to what some women in their homelands only fantasize about.

They have beautiful children or are planning on having children.

Sometimes these children have a hard time with their identity. Not only because there is an obvious difference in how they look in comparison to the rest of the kids at school, but because sometimes no matter how much they try to fit in, they may not be accepted as a real part of the culture.

A lot of children feel they are in no man’s land. Born in a country that one of their parents was not born in, in a land where Mummy has had to adjust to as well. A land where she has embraced a new culture but still in some ways holds on to her own.

She may give them names that she believes will help her children fit in more, shying from her own traditional name that gets shredded to pieces while being pronounced every day. She may work on getting them to join clubs, sports and associations that will keep them grounded and rooted in that culture. This is fantastic, nobody wants their child shunned or sticking out like a sore thumb.

I do believe it is important though to take a brave step and educate them about where you are from.

Where is it? Who are your parents? What games did you play when you were a little girl?

How are you teaching them to celebrate where YOU are from?

Is your child proud to say he/she has a parent that is from a different nation? Could your child say that she has visited been there is in touch with extended family? Could she have a story to tell about that place?

This middle ground is not exclusive for a child that is mixed race. I know someone that is half German and half French and born and raised in Germany.

When in Germany everyone calls him the ‘French guy’, when in France he is the ‘German guy’. He has admitted to feeling he does not belong anywhere and has come to accept it. He has done a good job of shrugging it off and enjoying both sides of his heritage. Finding a good spot in being knowledgeable about both sides of his parentage and embracing the fact that yes, he is a mix and loves both, celebrates both and can adapt on either side. Granted Germany and France are not that far away from each other, but that is the point exactly!

How are we preparing our children to deal with being in the middle with regards to their heritage? How do we tie in the two?

As for the singer that suffered the twitter massacre, in her defense, its not her fault she never visited when she was younger, its not her fault she could not relate. She may have never been taught to.

Teach your children to embrace every side of their heritage, if they choose to walk away from it that is their choice, but you are equipping them with a powerful weapon. Being able to empathize, relate to people from all walks of life. Most of all to live more comfortably and lovingly in the middle.

Twaambo Kapilikisha 300x200 Twaambo Kapilikisha   In the middle.

Twaambo Kapilikisha. Photo: Philipp Hamedl

 

Twaambo Kapilikisha who has discovered she has a knack for radio is a on a personal writing and speaking journey of discovery. She enjoys exploring the different facets of women and  exploring life by asking questions, through her blogs www.thebookwormgiraffe.blogspot.de and www.mukaintu.blogspot.de. You can also listen to her radio show called Diasporan Truth on www.zambiablogtalkradio.com where her intention is to engage Zambians in the diaspora to mobilise and bring positive change to Zambia.

Next month Kendra Williams-Valentine learns to love strawberries.

DeVon Thompson – Music, Memories and Moving ahead

In a new series of articles, black women living outside of Europe share their views from the other side. In our fourth article, DeVon Thompson discovered that music build bridges. 

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Photo: DeVon Thompson

Europe looms big!

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Photo: DeVon Thompson

That may sound strange coming from a black American woman but when you say the phrase ‘I’ve been to Europe people’s eyes light up, there is usually a pause followed by a ‘wow!’ or ‘you have!?’ The amount of Americans holding passports is low and even lower for black Americans. We know what Buckingham Palace looks like, the Eiffel Tower is one of the most recognized manmade structures in the world but despite many black Americans especially those my age (I’m an early 80′s baby) growing up with the sounds of Soul II Soul, Loose Ends, Incognito, Les Nubians and of course everyone knows ‘Return of the Mack’, the continent of Europe might as well be Mars for most.

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Photo: DeVon Thompson

I know Europe as a tourist, first in 2008 and just recently earlier this year in 2013. I grew up near a military base and had a friend who grew up in Germany as a pen pal; Europe wasn’t new to me when I landed at Frankfurt International Airport in 2008, although I was overly excited because like many I couldn’t believe I was actually there. Things changed when I landed at Heathrow this year, it was much more comfortable. I have a music focused blog and the ideas started to swirl while in Heidelberg, Germany on my first trip, I knew I had to reach out beyond my borders and found many of my associates were based in Europe. On my first trip and my most recent trip, I took note of the music scenes, the impact of American hip hop culture specifically. I felt that there was an energy that just wasn’t present in the U.S. I had the chance to visit Paris on my first European trip and I felt that Paris displayed just as much hip hop culture as you would see in New York City. Music was a way to connect with other black women in Europe some of whom are associates as well as those I met while visiting and I’ve learned that sharing the same culture interest transcends race even though we were all black women interacting. However the interest of music and hip hop was just a part of our initial meeting and conversations went deeper into racism, sexism and overall cultural differences.

DeVon Thompson DeVon Thompson   Music, Memories and Moving ahead

DeVon Thompson

 

 

 

 

 

 

DeVon Thompson is a writer and event producer. She currently publishes the website creativebeach.net, a website that focuses on music, travel and film. She has been writing online since 2008 and interviewed artists such as the Nigerian artist Nneka and UK MC Kano. DeVon has also written for several blogs and websites some of which include thecouchsessions.com and soulculture.co.uk. DeVon has also been featured on the London based creative culture site iamthenublack.com.

Next month Shaniqua Farrior lays out her plan to move to Antwerp.

pixel DeVon Thompson   Music, Memories and Moving ahead