Led by Brenda King, Chief Executive, African & Caribbean Diversity is improving the lives of our youth.

Led by Brenda King, Chief Executive, African & Caribbean Diversity are improving the lives of our youth.

rfo awards 2014 285 326x235 Led by Brenda King, Chief Executive, African & Caribbean Diversity is improving the lives of our youth.

In 2014 African & Caribbean Diversity has been recognised for its leadership in attracting, retaining and progressing the best Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) talent by being Highly Commended for the Developing Talent Award – Attraction at the Race for Opportunity Awards 2014. Race for Opportunity is the race equality campaign from Business in the Community.

African & Caribbean Diversity was Highly Commended for the Developing Talent Award – Attraction, which recognises organisations who have developed processes, initiatives and programmes that aim to help young BAME people to prepare for and enter the UK workforce. Read more.

Prospects LB Awards Commended RGB 330x357 Led by Brenda King, Chief Executive, African & Caribbean Diversity is improving the lives of our youth.

African & Caribbean Diversity was commended for its Commitment to the Community at the 2014 London Business Awards. The London Business Awards are organised by Prospects Business Support, part of the Prospects Group which provides a wide range of education, employment and training services in the UK and internationally. Read more.

PA fin 14 Led by Brenda King, Chief Executive, African & Caribbean Diversity is improving the lives of our youth.

African & Caribbean Diversity was shortlisted as a finalist in The 8th Annual PRECIOUS Awards in the Social Enterprise of the Year category.

The annual awards recognise those organisations that are pushing the boundaries, and supporting the needs and aspirations of women of colour in the business environment, as well as retaining its roots of recognising individual women and creating even more role models.

The Social Enterprise of the Year Award is given to social enterprise operated or owned by a woman of colour.

Read more to discover why Brenda King is a Black Women in Europe Power Lister.

Fruitvale Station screening in Oxford

Fruitvale Station depicts the events leading up to the death of Oscar Grant at the hands of a police officer in California in 2009.

When: Friday 6 February 2015 at5.30pm
Where: Lecture theatre on the second floor of the Radcliffe Humanities Building.
After the screening: Royal Oak with anyone who’s keen to discuss the film in a more relaxed environment

Rotterdam event – Black Hair Expo

Hat tip: Afro European Sisters Network

91310f2d c919 462a b0fe 22355635ee6c Rotterdam event   Black Hair Expo

29 maart 2015, Rotterdam The Netherlands
Op deze verwendag zal de donkere / getinte vrouw centraal staan.
Het event inspireert en informeert op die dag alle donkere en getinte vrouwen.

– Workshops natural hair
– Make-up
– Modeshows
– Hair shows
– Empowerment
– Kids Playground
– Informatie plein
– Entertainment
– Food en nog veel meer
Data:
zondag 29 maart 2015

Locatie:
World Trade Centre Rotterdam

Openingstijden:
Zondag: 11.00uur tot 19.00uur

Heeft een leuk idee of wilt u een stand huren vanaf 150,- euro!
LAAT ONS HET WETEN

Tevens zijn ook opzoek naar cosmetica (sample) producten voor onze goodiebags voor de eerst 1000 bezoekers. We verwachten op deze dag min. 2500 bezoekers. Dit is u kans om uw product onder de aandacht te brengen aan u potentiële doelgroep.

Wil je jouw evenement van heel dichtbij meemaken? Kom als vrijwilliger helpen!
Ben je een doener of juist een denker? En wil je actief deelnemen aan het evenement als vrijwilliger?
Van promotiemedewerker tot evenementenregelaar, van voorzitter tot redacteur mail ons.

Info:
info@fabvisi.com

I was a first-time mother, far from home, when I discovered that my three-year-old son had a hearing impairment.

In the 12th article in our “Inside View” series Lesley-Ann Brown shares what her deaf son taught her. Lesley originally published her story on The Murmur.

 I was a first time mother, far from home, when I discovered that my three year old son had a hearing impairment.

Kai. Photo from Black Girl on Mars

I was a first-time mother, far from home, when I discovered that my three-year-old son had a hearing impairment.

It was a shock because he had passed all his hearing tests and was even one of the first babies in my mothering group to say “bye bye” on cue. I thought he was not only developing by the book, but excelling too.

In retrospect, there were signs that something was amiss. When he played alone he was so deeply concentrated that he was hard to reach (“he’s just ignoring you”, people told me), he had a deep physical attachment to me (he would never just run off on his own), he hit other kids in daycare and kindergarten (anything to get a reaction he could understand) and he had started to mouth the words I was saying (apparently he was teaching himself how to lip read).

I was relieved when we received his diagnosis. The worst part was not knowing what was wrong. It also explained so much, and of all the things that could have been ‘wrong’ with my little boy, deafness was certainly not the worst. His father took the news less well. “But I wanted him to study music!” I remember he exclaimed.

We later learned that it’s quite normal for a parent to experience this depression and mourn the “perfect” child they used to have. The trick is to see that your child is still perfect, that they are the perfect expression of what they are meant to be.

Kai’s world blossomed after getting his hearing aids. It was obvious that he needed them from the moment he put them on. Having not heard for so long, he appreciated how this piece of technology could change his life completely.

Fitting in

But even though he took to his new technologically-improved life, I needed him to know he wasn’t alone. I made sure he was surrounded with imagery of other children with hearing aids and brought him into contact with other hearing-impaired children.

Ironically, he isn’t actually “deaf enough” to join the deaf community and we did not have the choice to send him to a special needs school for deaf children. If we had, he would have learned to sign and would now be part of – what I have experienced to be – a proud parallel society with its own culture, identity and role models. Instead we gave him hearing aids and sent him to ordinary schools where he received additional learning support.

This approach is called ‘mainstreaming’ and superficially it sounds like a good idea. If we could choose to be part of a bigger society, wouldn’t we? However, studies have shown that children like my son with moderate to heavy hearing loss tend to experience a lower quality of life than children who are more profoundly deaf. The latter go to school with each other, where they learn sign language and spend time with people who have the same issues as they do. This trend has been changing, to great debate.

Ambitions

Kai is now a teenager and seems to be thriving. His father’s fears were unfounded and he has already been in two bands, playing guitar in the first and drums in the second. He is even experimenting with music production. I’ve seen him design his own t-shirts and his father told me he’s a great skier. I know he’s not too bad on a skateboard either.

He still sticks out, though. One morning, a little girl came up to us and asked me, “Do those hearing aids help him?”

She was sweet – I love it when people just come right out and ask instead of gawking at him. And I understood why she asked. I was on my way to pick Kai up from school one day, when a group of kids from the deaf school boarded at Østerport Station and sat across from me. Despite having a deaf child, and against my better judgment, I stared at them.

I stared at their hands and the speed that they signed. I stared at their hearing aids and wondered if Kai would have preferred hearing aids like the blue pair worn by one of the boys. They didn’t notice me, so wrapped up and secure in their own little world to give me notice. I wish that my son was sitting next to me so we could witness this silent beauty – the incredible ability of human beings to adapt.

Then I remembered the little girl who so openly approached us the other morning. Some day, she and Kai could get on a Copenhagen train and talk, and continue their lives together with everyone else in the city. He too has adapted and, despite his limitations, is thriving.

I remember when he first learned about Einstein and he asked me what type of scientist he was.

“A physicist,” I replied.

“Well, I want to be one like him when I grow up.” I smiled, knowing that Kai didn’t necessarily want to be a physicist; he just wanted to earn people’s respect like Einstein had.

Kai may go on to learn about general relativity. He may even study music at the Royal Academy. We really don’t know what he will do. As long as the society he finds himself in is committed to accommodating everyone, the only limits he will ever experience are the limits he chooses to accept.

Lesley-Ann Brown
 I was a first time mother, far from home, when I discovered that my three year old son had a hearing impairment.

A Caribbean American freelance writer living in Copenhagen, Lesley-Ann studied writing at The New School, NYC. Lesley-Ann blogs at Black Girl on Mars.

‘My People Are Rising’ A conversation with Black Panther Aaron Dixon

2003304986 ‘My People Are Rising’ A conversation with Black Panther Aaron Dixon


East Oxford Community Centre, Saturday 24
th January 2015, 4pm.

Entrance free/ donation.

The Tricontinental Anti-Imperialist Platform and the African/ African Caribbean Kultural Heritage Initiative invite you to this exclusive conversation with brother/comrade Aaron Dixon. Aaron Dixon founded the Seattle branch of the Black Panther Party in his youth, developed the Free Breakfast Program for children which fed thousands of children, countered police brutality and developed global solidarity with movements against colonialism and neo-colonialism at the time.

At a time when the initiatives against police brutality are rising in the ‘west’, when movements are looking for viable examples of struggle and organising, the Black Panthers remain a signature experience to inform our present day struggles.

Aaron Dixon will also be signing copies of his book – My People Are Rising – which recounts his experiences as a Panther organiser.

The meeting will be followed by tasty Caribbean food from Taste of the Tropics from 6pm.

Lola Akinmade Åkerström’s bird’s-eye view of Stockholm

An urbanist’s guide to Stockholm: ‘Find your own secret space and own it’

 Lola Akinmade Åkerströms birds eye view of Stockholm

My name is Lola Akinmade Åkerström. I was born in Nigeria, studied and worked in the United States, and moved to Stockholm for love many moons ago after giving up my life as a system architect working with Geographic Information Systems (GIS). That was in 2009. Coming from two boisterous cultures – Nigerian and American – Sweden as a whole was an initial shock to the system. Life slowed down tremendously and the words “work-life balance” slowly crept into my psyche.

Today, I’m a freelance travel writer and photographer who contributes to many major publications. My photography is represented by National Geographic Creative and I’m also the editor-in-chief of Slow Travel Stockholm – a site that encourages travellers to my city to slow down, re-examine their motives for visiting, and get to know the city on a much deeper level. Yes, Stockholm truly is that superhot person who is also a modest rocket scientist. Getting beneath its surface is challenging but rewarding.

Read the full story on The Guardian.

AFROPEAN+

thmb 15637 img1 AFROPEAN+

CONCERTS, TALENT SHOW, CINEMA, READINGS, DEBATES, CREATIVE MARKET, AFRICAN FOOD, KIDS ANIMATIONS, EXHIBITIONS

 

Along the lines of the artist Pitcho Womba Konga’s Congolisation project, Afropean+ highlights the added value of the African diaspora in the European cultural landscape. Taking place within the context of the Belgian launch of the European Year for Development, this project affirms the interdependence between North and South, and promotes freedom, diversity, creation and solidarity as driving forces for our future. Sensitive as it is to these themes, BOZAR hosts the first edition of an exceptional multidisciplinary event. On this day, Afropean+ presents concerts by renowned artists, a stage set aside for young talents, not to mention films, debates, play readings, a craft fair, children’s entertainment, exhibitions and other activities all relating to the wealth of interculturality!
Dates
Saturday 17.01.2015 – 10:00 > 02:00
Place
Centre for Fine Arts / Check program
Access
Rue Ravenstein

 

AFROPEAN+

CONCERTS, TALENT SHOW, CINEMA, READINGS, DEBATES, CREATIVE MARKET, AFRICAN FOOD, KIDS ANIMATIONS, EXHIBITIONS


Along the lines of the artist Pitcho Womba Konga’s Congolisation project, Afropean+ highlights the added value of the African diaspora in the European cultural landscape. Taking place within the context of the Belgian launch of the European Year for Development, this project affirms the interdependence between North and South, and promotes freedom, diversity, creation and solidarity as driving forces for our future. Sensitive as it is to these themes, BOZAR hosts the first edition of an exceptional multidisciplinary event. On this day, Afropean+ presents concerts by renowned artists, a stage set aside for young talents, not to mention films, debates, play readings, a craft fair, children’s entertainment, exhibitions and other activities all relating to the wealth of interculturality!

Download document: AFROPEAN+ programme

Program changes may occur. We recommend that you take a look now and then at our website.

Dates
Saturday 17.01.2015 – 10:00 > 02:00
Place
Centre for Fine Arts / Check program
Access
Rue Ravenstein
:: Programme ::
Current
Upcoming
BOZAR | The Network for African Cultural Activities in Belgium (naca.be)