Live 12 April: Sylvana Simons – captivating TV audiences in the Netherlands

sylvana Live 12 April: Sylvana Simons   captivating TV audiences in the Netherlands
Sylvana Simons was born in Suriname and grew up in Amsterdam. From 1995 to 1999 she presented the radio program Sylvana’s Soul and was dubbed the Dutch Queen of Soul. Sylvana in 2000 began presenting TV programs like RTL Live, TV agency and Dancing with the Stars.

From 1999, she presented her own talk show every Sunday on Radio 538. From 2001 to 2003 every Friday she has her own program Sylvana’s Soul on North Sea FM. From July 2009 to September 2010 she made every weekday program Sylvana’s Choice.

Since September 2011 Sylvana is back on Radio 6 Soul & Jazz! Every Monday (23-1) in Radio 6 Presents: Sylvana Simons brings them the best soul classics, new discoveries and soul homegrown talent!

April 12 event in Amsterdam

Sylvana feat 700x432 Live 12 April: Sylvana Simons   captivating TV audiences in the Netherlands

April 12 at 7pm

*Rough event translation

Let’s bring back the soul!

Sylvana’s Soul Live is a spectacular, musical talk show where Sylvana Simons receives top musicians and music lovers.

With the arrival of her weekly show TMF Sylvana’s Soul, Sylvana Simons continued in the 90s soul and R & B for good on the Dutch music map. It earned her the nickname “The Dutch Queen of R & B” on.

In a unique live experience down memory lane in the Amsterdam North Sea Jazz Club, she blows from April 12 each year the music, but also the image of that time new life.

Assisted by DJ, band leader and music connoisseur Dillon Lewis, Sylvana receives artists who share their love of music through interviews and live performances and take us to the origins of contemporary black music. Marvin Gaye, Nile Rodgers, Jodeci and Mary J. Blige to Pharrel, Angie Stone and Justin Timberlake. Old soul, funk and disco and through swing beat to the R & B today.

The crowd enjoying a show with live performances and a special soul food menu, and of course we end the evening swinging on the dance floor with DJ Dillon behind the decks!

Line up & special guests T.B.A.

North Sea Jazz Club
Pazzanistraat 1
020 7220 980

Indra Rios-Moore in Denmark: Every story has a start, middle and an end.

Hat tip: Lorraine Spencer

71p9Zt6RnnL. SX425 PJautoripBadge,BottomRight,4, 40 OU11   Indra Rios Moore in Denmark: Every story has a start, middle and an end.

Indra Rios-Moore’s story begins on the Lower East Side of Manhattan, continues across the Atlantic in Denmark, but as yet has not come close to reaching a climax, or thankfully an ending. Like every good story it has had twists along the way, ups, as well as downs, joy and pain, but also sacrifice and success. If art reflects life then it is little wonder that Indra’s album, Heartland is eclecticism in the extreme…it is an album that is both intensely personal but also broad in its musical sweep. Hardly surprising given Indra’s story.

Indra, named by her mother after the Hindu warrior deity of the sky and the rain, was born to a Puerto Rican social worker, Elizabeth, and an African-American-Syrian jazz bassist, Donald Moore (his credits include, the New York Contemporary Five, Archie Shepp, Elvin Jones, Sonny Rollins, and Jackie McLean). Growing up in a tough neighborhood, Indra spent her formative years in an imaginary world with her mother’s extensive record collection of jazz, soul, and rock music for company.

Singing was always a private experience for Indra, but at the age of 13, her mother convinced her to audition for a place at Mannes College of Music; despite her inhibitions about her singing Indra was awarded a scholarship. Indra developed her soprano voice and during the same year that she started studying at Mannes, she attended the Village Harmony, summer camp in Northern Vermont. Her teenage years were spent in a musical parallel existence; one full of classical arias and vocalization practice and the other filled with traditional American folks tunes and old Balkan folk songs in the woods of Vermont. 

While working as a waitress in a Brooklyn wine bar, she met Benjamin Traerup, a Danish jazz saxophonist; three weeks later they were living together and one year after that they were married and living in Denmark. According to Indra,

“If I hadn’t been young and a little stupid I would never have moved to Denmark, but I was in love, and I still am, so it was a pragmatic choice. It took me four years to learn Danish, as it is not a language that falls naturally from an American tongue. In the end we found that creativity was in part born out of hardship.”

Read Indra’s full bio on her website.

Vote for Kendra’s blog in the 6th Annual @saveurmag Blog Awards

Topbar Vote for Kendras blog in the 6th Annual @saveurmag Blog Awards is a Finalist for “Best Use of #Video” in the 6th Annual @saveurmag Blog Awards! We are one of six finalists (out of 50,000!) in the “Best Use of Video” category: and I need your vote! Click the link in the bio!

SAV 15 SBA LOGO final 0 Vote for Kendras blog in the 6th Annual @saveurmag Blog Awards

Vote for AmeriCulinariska

Now until April 30, 2015 voting will be open at NOTE: You have to sign up/login to vote. First hover over the AmeriCulinariska image, choose vote, and you’ll be asked to login or register. Simple process!

Musimbi Kanyoro, President and CEO of Global Fund for Women speaking at Women@TheTable: The Cutting Edge

musimbi kanyoro th Musimbi Kanyoro, President and CEO of Global Fund for Women speaking at Women@TheTable: The Cutting Edge

Dr Musimbi Kanyoro is the President and Chief Executive Officer of the Global Fund for Women and has been a passionate advocate for the health, development and human rights of women, girls and minority groups throughout her life. Prior to the Global Fund, Dr Kanyoro led the Population and Reproductive Health Programme at the David and Lucile Packard Foundation, and also served for 10 years as General Secretary of World YWCA. Dr. Kanyoro is a member of the Aspen Institute Leaders Council and the UNFPA/IPPF High-level Taskforce for Reproductive Health. She also sits on the boards of Intra Health, CHANGE and CARE.

Location Arts at the Old Fire Station, Oxford, England | 1 PM Thursday 16 April (BST)

 Musimbi Kanyoro, President and CEO of Global Fund for Women speaking at Women@TheTable: The Cutting Edge

Meagan Fallone, Barefoot College, CEO, (scaling its revolutionary rural model around the world); Musimbi Kanyoro, Global Fund for Women, CEO, (#BeTheSpark campaign to put women + technology front + center); Jensine Larsen, World Pulse, CEO, (digital vision to connect women worldwide + give voice to the voiceless) Antonella Notari Vischer, Womanity Foundation, Director, (replicating + scaling groundbreaking work); Sharon Bylenga, Media Matters for Women, Founder, (connecting rural women to information + community through technology).

Join us! Bring a friend!

And some great questions!
love, women@thetable

Barbados born Marvo Straughn from Lewisham tells us how she came up with the idea of her business of Caribbean Baby Foods.

How we started

I had a dream I was in a supermarket with my baby son Andrew who was in his buggy and he wanted me to buy some cornmeal porridge, (which is a traditional dish in the Caribbean). I looked at the shelves in the baby isle, but could not see any, then I woke up, and suddenly the idea came to me. I then told my other 2 children Roxanne and Toni that I will go to some shops to check out the varieties of baby foods, and was surprised to find there were were no Caribbean recipes available. Now my dream has become a reality.

After realising there was a demand for Caribbean baby food and no one producing it. Marvo experimented with some recipes trying them out on family and friends. She started selling them in Lewisham market where she found a great demand for the Caribbean recipes. Since then Marvo has approached local retailers, schools, nurseries and hospitals and has had a great response.


 Barbados born Marvo Straughn from Lewisham tells us how she came up with the idea of her business of Caribbean Baby Foods.

Marvo Straughn and Prince Charles.

Marvo’s frozen baby foods are for babies from the age of 4 months plus, (stage 1). The recipes are formulated using the finest natural ingredients, ready for baby to eat. The products have a 12 month shelf life, and there are 5 delicious recipes available. The foods are lovingly handmade and once made, the foods are blast frozen, to seal in the goodness and flavours.

Marvo Foods contain no additives or preservatives. Currently 5 recipes are available:

Apple and Mango

Green Banana and Pumpkin

Sweet Potato and Carrot

Cornmeal Porridge

Cod and Plantain

Introducing the ‘Our Voices” series – From Denmark, Black Girl on Mars

Our voices Introducing the Our Voices series   From Denmark, Black Girl on Mars

I have been, if not a friend, a friendly acquaintance and fan of Lesley-Ann Brown, a.k.a. Black Girl on Mars since 2006 or so. Her writing is so compelling I am grateful she has agreed to let me share her work here in a new series of blog posts titled ‘Our Voices’*. Her first contribution in this series was originally published on The Murmur.

Right. Wrong. Right. Wrong. Right. Wrong.

Two knitting needles and a ball of yarn – that’s what I used to integrate into the Danish society. Sitting together but separately, I wove myself into the fabric of this culture, though it was my fingers that did all the work.

 Introducing the Our Voices series   From Denmark, Black Girl on Mars

No, I am not being indecisive.

Right. Wrong. Right. Wrong. Right. Wrong. That’s me learning how to knit as, hunched over two knitting needles, I struggle to “capture” the “free” yarn into the stitches already cast onto my needles.

Although the rest of the English speaking world learns to knit purl knit purl knit purl, my teacher Anni, is Danish. She teaches me to ‘ret og vrang’ instead, but all I hear is ‘right and wrong, right and wrong’.

After all, I don’t speak a word of Danish and her English isn’t fluent, but together we are moving into uncharted territory. While I patiently learn to knit, I start my timid journey of learning Danish. And through me, Anni gets to practice her English. It is no wonder that I could read Danish knitting patterns years before I could actually speak the language.

At the time, I am four months pregnant and a new arrival in Denmark. Anni is my mother in law, and I spend hours with her while my then-husband busily prepares for the arrival of our child. During this time together, Anni and I manage to cultivate our own authentic relationship, based on love – a relationship solidified through knitting.

There is perhaps no greater show of love than teaching someone to knit. It requires patience and presence – virtues held by my Danish mother-in-law. Although I am no longer married to her son, she will always hold a special place in my heart. Her teaching me to knit plays no small part in this.

It was through Anni that I was introduced to a tolerant Denmark. An open Denmark. Through Anni I met her Tante Liv, Anni’s fiercely independent aunt. We got along famously. She introduced me to the herbal flowers in her garden and taught me how to make natural teas. Once she leaned in and whispered, “There is something about a young woman moving 6000 miles away from her place of home.”

Tante Liv’s husband, Onkel Per, was a character. He took my pregnant South African friend and me to his boat club in northern Denmark. You could tell he got a kick from all the stares he received, an elderly Danish man with two young, pregnant and very foreign women. I still laugh when I think about that day, the way his big blue eyes twinkled as we sat in his boat, out at sea, and the other boats passed us by.

Tante Liv, as well as the rest of her family, treated me with nothing but love, respect and openness. It was a family of women who read and think. I was in my element. We were of the same tribe, brought together through the craft of knitting.

I had always wanted to learn how to knit. Whenever my grandmother from Trinidad visited us on Ocean Avenue in Brooklyn, smelling like peppermint and airplane, she would always have a few knitting and craft magazines with her.

They were full of knitwear masterpieces and patterns I had not yet learned to decipher. Despite being a renaissance woman of sorts, my grandmother did not know how to knit. She offered other lessons, including her deep, unwavering commitment to me. “You are here for a reason,” she’d whisper in my ear. Her words would soothe my unsettled soul like a cool Caribbean breeze.

My great grandmother Beryl Nunez died from “the draught,” a reference that could just as much allude to the cold as to racism, I suppose, in Canada. She made lace. My other great grandmother, Frances Lopez, also made exquisite handkerchiefs, delicate lace curtains and tablecloths. But despite my burning desire, there was no YouTube back then and no one to teach me. Don’t feel sorry for me; the 80s furnished me with plastic bubble jackets and roller skates. We played ‘run, catch, kiss’ and I mastered Double Dutch. I was happily distracted from myself.

Fast forward. I meet my Dane. We court. I meet his mother. It was love at first sight. My ex-husband and his mother ushered me into Danish culture with love and patience. And I know it was love, because she took the time to teach me to knit.

I have now gone on to teach three grade five classes how to knit and I stood back in wonder as I watched the children teach each other. I saw how boys want to learn how to knit as much as girls. I simmered with joy as the students worked together but separately, sitting quietly and knitting.

When I hold the yarn in my hand, I feel as though it connects me to my great-grandmothers. But it was Anni who brought out that creative energy. Knitting is magic, knitting is healing. Knitting is immeasurable. When you knit, your brain produces beta waves. No matter what troubles me, if I catch a whiff of wool, spy a ball of yarn, or hold a pair of knitting needles (bamboo preferably), I’m in bliss.

My time here has been sustained by the energy knitting has given me. When I returned from my last trip to the States in the autumn, I knew that I wanted to incorporate knitting more into my life. When I was in Rhode Island at the Rhode Island Writers Colony, I went to see the writer Anne Hood read from her latest book, “An Italian Wife”. She saw me in the audience with my knitting needles and yarn, stopped what she was saying and called out to ask me what I was knitting. A baby blanket for my friend’s newborn baby, I replied.

That’s what I love about knitting: it brings people together. So when I returned to Denmark, my intention was to start a knitting group.  I shyly put out a call of interest on Facebook and, to my delight, the Geeky Knitter’s Club was borne. Every week, a group of other expat women and myself gather to knit, talk, and offer support. It is one of the best ventures I have embarked on.

And the kids? Although I am no longer teaching, I still knit with them. All of this I owe to Anni Bomholtz – the most loving of ex-mother-in-laws.

Lesley-Ann Brown
 Introducing the Our Voices series   From Denmark, Black Girl on Mars

A Trinidadian American freelance writer living in Copenhagen, Lesley-Ann studied writing at The New School, NYC.
Read Lesley’s full bio. It’s fascinating!

*”Our Voices” aims to provide a platform for writers to share their work. The stories may have been published previously and are posted here due to their relevance to the black women’s experience in Europe.

Margaret Gärding

Margaret Gärding and F!


MG for F Margaret Gärding and F!

Margaret Gärding

Feminist Initiative (Swedish: Feministiskt initiativ, abbreviated Fi or F!) is a feminist political party in Sweden. The party was formed (from a previous pressure group of the same name) in 2005, and announced on 9 September 2005 that it would put up candidates for the 2006 parliamentary elections in Sweden.

After running in the consequent two Riksdag elections, as well as the European Parliamentary election of 2009, Fi had not taken any seats in either parliament. The European elections of 2014 proved a turning point, as the party attracted 5.3% of the Swedish vote, with Soraya Post taking one seat in the European Parliament. This marks the first time an exclusively feminist political party won a seat in the European Parliament.

In the 2014 general election, Fi received a best-ever 3.1% of the vote; despite not meeting the 4.0% threshold for getting seats, Fi became the most popular party outside of parliament.

Margaret Gärding is the 1st stand in to go to the European Parliament when the F! party leader is unavailable. She leads Fi’s work concerning the European Union. She is part of the Nominating Committee for the party’s next elections.