Webcast of the Economic Legacy of the Transatlantic Slave Trade


Yesterday the Dr. Eric E. Williams Memorial Lecture Series – Setting the Scene: The Economic Legacy of the Transatlantic Slave Trade was held in London from 6pm – 9.30pm
at the City Hall, Queen’s Walk in London. This was the first lecture in the series introducing the Economic Legacy of the Transatlantic Slave Trade and re-launching the book Capitalism and Slavery.View the webcast now!

Were You Raised in a Black Church?


Can you fill in the blanks? Don’t cheat (the answers are below)!!!

“First giving ______ to God, who is the _______ of my life, I’d like to say I’m glad to be in the ________ of the Lord one mo’ time. Cause he brought me from a ___long_____. I coulda been dead, sleeping in my________, but God is_______ all the ________, and all the_____, God is _______. He’s a _______ over troubled waters. He’s a mother to the ________, and a_________to the __________, a doctor in a ________ room, and a___________ in the courtroom! (smile) He’s the_______ of the valley, a bright and ________star
He got up early one __________ mon’ing,with all __________ in his
_______.
Pray for me that I grow _________ in t he Lord.”
Also, as you look in your church_______, under the special _________ please keep in your prayer _______ Sista Buela-Mae Jenkins who will be having her ________ surgery this week. And while you give your tithes and _______ we humbly ask that you contribute to the church_______ fund and we will be celebrating the pastor’s fifteenth________ so anybody please who serves on the _______ board please meet in the ________ following_________. And the women’s auxiliary will be selling ________ dinners for $7.00 a _____ along with the youth ______ who will be having their annual ______ sale to help fund their trip to the national youth ministry_______in Tennessee this s! ummer. Parents please be _______that vacation_______school begins June 19, please have your child________ by May 13.
You knew them all, if not most of them, didn’t you?!!! You must go to a black church!

Answers:
honor
head
house
mighty/way
grave
good
time
time
good
bridge
motherless
father/fatherless
sickroom
lawyer
Lily
shining
Sunday
power/hands
stronger
bulletins
announcements
requests
hip
offerings
building
anniversary
usher
sanctuary/service
chicken
plate
Choir
bake
convention
mindful
bible
registered

Slaver voyages

Here are some brutal facts about the French slavers:
– Slaver voyages: France, 4,200; British North America/United States, 1,500.
– Slaves transported: France 1,250,000, British North America/United States,
300,000.
– Slaves delivered to: French West Indies: 1,600,000, British North America/United
States, 500,000.

In the history of the Atlantic slave trade, the French turned four times as many Africans into slaves as the Americans did, they used them far more brutally, and French slavers not only got a head-start on Americans, they continued the slave trade — legally — until 1830, long after the rest of Europe had given it up. And they kept at it clandestinely until after the U.S. Civil War. France officially abolished slavery in its colonies only 14 years before Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation, and then only under pressure from slave uprisings. Get the facts

.


L’ AURORE was built in 1784 in France by the shipbuilder H. Penevert. The length amounted to 31 m, the width to 8.7 m, the displacement to 500 tons at 4 m draught. From France ships of this kind sailed to the coast of Angola, in order to take over 600 slaves for the journey to Haiti, at that time French colony Saint Domingue. From there colonial goods were bought, usually sugar, and transported to France.

The Danish-Norwegian Slave Ship Fredensborg


In January 1792, the King issued a royal ordinance declaring the end of Danish slave exports as of 1 January 1803. Thus Denmark-Norway was the first European nation to abolish its export slave trade. However, that reputation was tainted by the export of some 30,000 Africans during the last decade of legal commerce in slaves. Moreover, illicit slave trading continued from Danish forts, particularly Fort Fredensborg, until the 1830s and – 1840s. Slavery in the Danish West Indian colonies was abolished after a rebellion on July 3, 1848. In 1917 the three West Indian islands were sold to USA and renamed the U.S. Virgin Islands. Read the entire UNESCO project.